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A Grateful Thanksgiving

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A Grateful Thanksgiving 2021/11/29, 21:58
A Grateful Thanksgiving

<p> <!-- wp:cover {"url":"https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg","id":4918,"dimRatio":0,"focalPoint":{"x":"0.52","y":"0.50"},"align":"center","className":"nvd-bg-div"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-cover aligncenter nvd-bg-div"><img class="img-responsive" class= "wp-block-cover__image-background wp-image-4918" alt="" src= "https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg" style="object-position:52% 50%" data-object-fit="cover" data-object-position="52% 50%" /> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --> <h2 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-a-grateful-thanksgiving">A Grateful Thanksgiving</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cover --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"1ec064cf","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/columns {"block_id":"7bdf8e47","classMigrate":true,"leftPadding":0,"rightPadding":0} --> <div class="uagb-columns__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-columns__inner-wrap uagb-columns__columns-2"> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"6f3c713d","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-6f3c713d"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-watch-now">Watch Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:embed {"url":"https://youtu.be/PWBrPEzcoi8","type":"video","providerNameSlug":"youtube","responsive":true,"className":"wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper"> https://youtu.be/PWBrPEzcoi8</div> <p><!-- /wp:embed --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"aa510081","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-aa510081"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-listen-now">Listen Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> <div class="wp-block-create-block-libsyn-podcasting-block"> <div class="libsyn-shortcode"></div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/columns --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"38dbc763","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-a-grateful-thanksgiving-1"> A Grateful Thanksgiving</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">A warm Happy Thanksgiving from our Peaks Recovery Family to yours! In this short and fun episode our leaders share what they are grateful for, and give their personal thanks.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Topics:</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:list {"ordered":true} --></p> <ol> <li>Jason Friesema shares his gratefulness and thanks</li> <li>Chris Burns shares his gratefulness and thanks</li> <li>Brandon Burns shares his gratefulness and thanks</li> <li>Clinton Nicholson shares his gratefulness and thanks</li> </ol> <p><!-- /wp:list --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"8e931f3d","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#225b67"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","style":{"color":{"text":"#fff351"}}} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center has-text-color" id= "h-select-quotes" style="color:#fff351">Select Quotes</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/blockquote {"block_id":"2da4bdfe","classMigrate":true,"descriptionText":"Grateful and thankful because I truly do feel like I am a part of something special. It’s out of that great energy that we continue forward with quality care and saving people’s lives each and every day. Profoundly filled with gratitude for all of that.","descColor":"#ffffff","author":"Brandon Burns, CEO","authorColor":"#ffffff","enableTweet":false} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-blockquote uagb-blockquote__outer-wrap uagb-block-2da4bdfe"> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__wrap uagb-blockquote__skin-border uagb-blockquote__stack-img-none"> <blockquote class="uagb-blockquote"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content-wrap"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content">Grateful and thankful because I truly do feel like I am a part of something special. It’s out of that great energy that we continue forward with quality care and saving people’s lives each and every day. Profoundly filled with gratitude for all of that.</div> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__author-wrap uagb-blockquote__author-at-left"> <cite class="uagb-blockquote__author">Brandon Burns, CEO</cite></div> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/blockquote --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"4e91e39e","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"none","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-transcripts"> Episode Transcripts</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/faq {"block_id":"403a3510","schema":"{\u0022@context\u0022:\u0022https://schema.org\u0022,\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022FAQPage\u0022,\u0022@id\u0022:\u0022https://peaksrecovery.com/?p=9341\u0022,\u0022mainEntity\u0022:[{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Question\u0022,\u0022name\u0022:\u0022A Grateful Thanksgiving Transcript\u0022,\u0022acceptedAnswer\u0022:{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Answer\u0022,\u0022text\u0022:\u0022\u003cbr\u003eall right welcome everybody to a very short episode of finding peeks today really it's a holiday season we got the thanksgiving coming up in that regard it's literally today it is literally i guess it's restored i'm obviously around all of the hosts today and the people have been you know continually a big part of this here at finding peaks and so a lot of energy in this room trying to um level one up over me at this time it's okay i'm i'm secure in my host seat now at this moment but really today we just want to start with what are we grateful for here at peaks recovery centers and just take this brief opportunity to share that with you all and um i know i'm grateful for the past year a lot's gone on here at peak's recovery but don't want to kick it off with me i think in general fashion as i do we'll lean right into jason friesman chief clinical officer of peace recovery centers and jason what are we thankful for here let's go well i gotta say this is uh when that question was posed to me i actually reflected on just a few weeks ago i i was interviewing a clinician candidate um who i think probably pulled the question off of the interweb on what to ask during the interview and she asked me what my best day at peaks was and i said my best day is actually today because it was wednesday and wednesdays are the days that i get to meet with the clinical team and so i'm just so incredibly grateful to be able to be a part of a team um that is uh diverse that has different perspectives um that passionately carries forward the division that we all share in this room full stop love it love you man yeah absolutely yeah um well we'll just let's go around the room here all right good counterclockwise counterclockwise yeah chris burns president founder of course if that was or also known as uh big burnsie cheerleader no he's emergency he is our motivational specialist yeah yeah i like that definitely yeah because it was cheerleader and he's like no it's gonna be like motivational specialists yeah um you know i was just chatting with the guys before the show um i'm grateful for a tremendous amount today the last year has been wildly intense with the pandemic i'm reminded of this week a year ago this week and that was a time when we unfortunately had to shut down our women's program we didn't have any testing supplies we didn't understand the pandemic like we do now um and for guys like brandon and i um who have showed up and clinton and jason and all of the team that have showed up and poured their hearts and souls into this thing last year was a very real realization that this could go away and that was very scared sad somewhat hurt because it was so much out of our control and i'm grateful to be sitting in this chair today with great team members by our side and in addition to that i'm grateful that peaks recovery is here to continue to help vulnerable people and really more than anything i'm grateful for the team's trust throughout the process i'm a young professional i started young i make a lot of mistakes and the team has just really trusted us throughout this process and gotten behind us and it's just really meant the world so i'm grateful to be sitting here today in a peaks recovery center program who can help more people today than ever and is stronger today than ever so i just couldn't be more proud so thank you thank you thanks chris um it's powerful uh for me um yeah it it really you know i got elevated to the ceo role in i think june or july of 2020 and uh you know didn't understand or know what was what i was really you know becoming a part of in a really big way in that regard and you know the pandemic caused a lot of strain on our staff on our company culture and that strain led into kind of the closing of our you know our women's program uh this time last year in november and there was just a lot of hurtful things and fear that was created for myself in the process and to come into 2021 and to have you come into the role of chief um operating officer as well too which has just been a tremendous value to this company culture i think collectively there's a lot of people missing in this room who've contributed to the success of the company in the last year and the continuation of our mission to save lives um but we showed up in a big way and i think we've learned how to uh manage a company culture in a way that we've never done as a you know kind of thinking of what you were stating chris there's a there's a certain immaturity that takes place for young you know business owners and leaders in that regard and you just don't see everything that you could be taught in you know a master's program and so forth in business and school and um so to be here in this state to be serving women again in programming to have a robust iop program that i think is just invaluably serving that side of our patient demographic to have the health to look forward as leaders in the organization to our team meetings and everything that's brought to us in those moments just grateful and thankful because i really do feel like i'm a part of something special and it's out of that energy that we continue forward with quality care and saving people's lives each and every day and just profoundly filled with uh yeah gratitude for all of that so thanks friend all right top all that yeah jeez that's a it's a high bar all right well i will do my best deep into the field i'm gonna have to crack that door open all right here we go uh like you guys mentioned um it was a year ago almost exactly this week that the women's program closed um and it was actually a year ago uh last week that i started so i i walking into a new job into a new role into a new company and within days having about 30 percent of it shut down and watching staff go away and and seeing this and seeing um a real true impact of what a pandemic can do to not only to a business but just to individual lives and the way that it impacted um people in need who didn't have access to treatment because of that was that was really pretty poignant for me and um i had a very real moment where i had to ask myself should i stay and it was uh yeah and i decided that i believed in this place i just started but i for some reason i just knew that it was the right move and i am extremely grateful that i made the right decision so thank you guys thank you thank you absolutely well i love you guys glad we could take this opportunity to share in this special moment together and you know celebrate uh thanksgiving and our what we're grateful for here at peaks and you know again as we uh go into the holidays collectively all together in this regard you know give grace to your loved ones addiction and mental health is a real thing um i know not all families experience it but many families do and so just give your loved ones grace and there is hope there's places like peaks other excellent opportunities out there on the other side of the holidays in that regard to get help for your loved one in that regard so um love you all thank you so much for being with us for walking through these episodes with us and uh looking forward to the next episode on the other side of the holidays take care everybody happy thanksgiving happy thanksgiving\u0022}}]}"} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq uagb-faq__outer-wrap uagb-block-403a3510 uagb-faq-icon-row uagb-faq-layout-accordion uagb-faq-expand-first-false uagb-faq-inactive-other-true uagb-faq-equal-height" data-faqtoggle="true" role="tablist"> <div class="uagb-faq__wrap uagb-buttons-layout-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/faq-child {"block_id":"3d8b3aad","question":"A Grateful Thanksgiving Transcript","answer":"\u003cbr\u003eall right welcome everybody to a very short episode of finding peeks today really it's a holiday season we got the thanksgiving coming up in that regard it's literally today it is literally i guess it's restored i'm obviously around all of the hosts today and the people have been you know continually a big part of this here at finding peaks and so a lot of energy in this room trying to um level one up over me at this time it's okay i'm i'm secure in my host seat now at this moment but really today we just want to start with what are we grateful for here at peaks recovery centers and just take this brief opportunity to share that with you all and um i know i'm grateful for the past year a lot's gone on here at peak's recovery but don't want to kick it off with me i think in general fashion as i do we'll lean right into jason friesman chief clinical officer of peace recovery centers and jason what are we thankful for here let's go well i gotta say this is uh when that question was posed to me i actually reflected on just a few weeks ago i i was interviewing a clinician candidate um who i think probably pulled the question off of the interweb on what to ask during the interview and she asked me what my best day at peaks was and i said my best day is actually today because it was wednesday and wednesdays are the days that i get to meet with the clinical team and so i'm just so incredibly grateful to be able to be a part of a team um that is uh diverse that has different perspectives um that passionately carries forward the division that we all share in this room full stop love it love you man yeah absolutely yeah um well we'll just let's go around the room here all right good counterclockwise counterclockwise yeah chris burns president founder of course if that was or also known as uh big burnsie cheerleader no he's emergency he is our motivational specialist yeah yeah i like that definitely yeah because it was cheerleader and he's like no it's gonna be like motivational specialists yeah um you know i was just chatting with the guys before the show um i'm grateful for a tremendous amount today the last year has been wildly intense with the pandemic i'm reminded of this week a year ago this week and that was a time when we unfortunately had to shut down our women's program we didn't have any testing supplies we didn't understand the pandemic like we do now um and for guys like brandon and i um who have showed up and clinton and jason and all of the team that have showed up and poured their hearts and souls into this thing last year was a very real realization that this could go away and that was very scared sad somewhat hurt because it was so much out of our control and i'm grateful to be sitting in this chair today with great team members by our side and in addition to that i'm grateful that peaks recovery is here to continue to help vulnerable people and really more than anything i'm grateful for the team's trust throughout the process i'm a young professional i started young i make a lot of mistakes and the team has just really trusted us throughout this process and gotten behind us and it's just really meant the world so i'm grateful to be sitting here today in a peaks recovery center program who can help more people today than ever and is stronger today than ever so i just couldn't be more proud so thank you thank you thanks chris um it's powerful uh for me um yeah it it really you know i got elevated to the ceo role in i think june or july of 2020 and uh you know didn't understand or know what was what i was really you know becoming a part of in a really big way in that regard and you know the pandemic caused a lot of strain on our staff on our company culture and that strain led into kind of the closing of our you know our women's program uh this time last year in november and there was just a lot of hurtful things and fear that was created for myself in the process and to come into 2021 and to have you come into the role of chief um operating officer as well too which has just been a tremendous value to this company culture i think collectively there's a lot of people missing in this room who've contributed to the success of the company in the last year and the continuation of our mission to save lives um but we showed up in a big way and i think we've learned how to uh manage a company culture in a way that we've never done as a you know kind of thinking of what you were stating chris there's a there's a certain immaturity that takes place for young you know business owners and leaders in that regard and you just don't see everything that you could be taught in you know a master's program and so forth in business and school and um so to be here in this state to be serving women again in programming to have a robust iop program that i think is just invaluably serving that side of our patient demographic to have the health to look forward as leaders in the organization to our team meetings and everything that's brought to us in those moments just grateful and thankful because i really do feel like i'm a part of something special and it's out of that energy that we continue forward with quality care and saving people's lives each and every day and just profoundly filled with uh yeah gratitude for all of that so thanks friend all right top all that yeah jeez that's a it's a high bar all right well i will do my best deep into the field i'm gonna have to crack that door open all right here we go uh like you guys mentioned um it was a year ago almost exactly this week that the women's program closed um and it was actually a year ago uh last week that i started so i i walking into a new job into a new role into a new company and within days having about 30 percent of it shut down and watching staff go away and and seeing this and seeing um a real true impact of what a pandemic can do to not only to a business but just to individual lives and the way that it impacted um people in need who didn't have access to treatment because of that was that was really pretty poignant for me and um i had a very real moment where i had to ask myself should i stay and it was uh yeah and i decided that i believed in this place i just started but i for some reason i just knew that it was the right move and i am extremely grateful that i made the right decision so thank you guys thank you thank you absolutely well i love you guys glad we could take this opportunity to share in this special moment together and you know celebrate uh thanksgiving and our what we're grateful for here at peaks and you know again as we uh go into the holidays collectively all together in this regard you know give grace to your loved ones addiction and mental health is a real thing um i know not all families experience it but many families do and so just give your loved ones grace and there is hope there's places like peaks other excellent opportunities out there on the other side of the holidays in that regard to get help for your loved one in that regard so um love you all thank you so much for being with us for walking through these episodes with us and uh looking forward to the next episode on the other side of the holidays take care everybody happy thanksgiving happy thanksgiving"} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq-child uagb-faq-child__outer-wrap uagb-block-3d8b3aad"> <div class="uagb-faq-child__wrapper"> <div class="uagb-faq-item" role="tab"> <div class="uagb-faq-questions-button uagb-faq-questions"> <span class="uagb-question">A Grateful Thanksgiving Transcript</span></div> <div class="uagb-faq-content"><span><br /> <br /></span> <p><span>all right welcome everybody to a very short episode of finding peeks today really it's a holiday season we got the thanksgiving coming up in that regard it's literally today it is literally i guess it's restored i'm obviously around all of the hosts today and the people have been you know continually a big part of this here at finding peaks and so a lot of energy in this room trying to um level one up over me at this time it's okay i'm i'm secure in my host seat now at this moment but really today we just want to start with what are we grateful for here at peaks recovery centers and just take this brief opportunity to share that with you all and um i know i'm grateful for the past year a lot's gone on here at peak's recovery but don't want to kick it off with me i think in general fashion as i do we'll lean right into jason friesman chief clinical officer of peace recovery centers and jason what are we thankful for here let's go well i gotta say this is uh when that question was posed to me i actually reflected on just a few weeks ago i i was interviewing a clinician candidate um who i think probably pulled the question off of the interweb on what to ask during the interview and she asked me what my best day at peaks was and i said my best day is actually today because it was wednesday and wednesdays are the days that i get to meet with the clinical team and so i'm just so incredibly grateful to be able to be a part of a team um that is uh diverse that has different perspectives um that passionately carries forward the division that we all share in this room full stop love it love you man yeah absolutely yeah um well we'll just let's go around the room here all right good counterclockwise counterclockwise yeah chris burns president founder of course if that was or also known as uh big burnsie cheerleader no he's emergency he is our motivational specialist yeah yeah i like that definitely yeah because it was cheerleader and he's like no it's gonna be like motivational specialists yeah um you know i was just chatting with the guys before the show um i'm grateful for a tremendous amount today the last year has been wildly intense with the pandemic i'm reminded of this week a year ago this week and that was a time when we unfortunately had to shut down our women's program we didn't have any testing supplies we didn't understand the pandemic like we do now um and for guys like brandon and i um who have showed up and clinton and jason and all of the team that have showed up and poured their hearts and souls into this thing last year was a very real realization that this could go away and that was very scared sad somewhat hurt because it was so much out of our control and i'm grateful to be sitting in this chair today with great team members by our side and in addition to that i'm grateful that peaks recovery is here to continue to help vulnerable people and really more than anything i'm grateful for the team's trust throughout the process i'm a young professional i started young i make a lot of mistakes and the team has just really trusted us throughout this process and gotten behind us and it's just really meant the world so i'm grateful to be sitting here today in a peaks recovery center program who can help more people today than ever and is stronger today than ever so i just couldn't be more proud so thank you thank you thanks chris um it's powerful uh for me um yeah it it really you know i got elevated to the ceo role in i think june or july of 2020 and uh you know didn't understand or know what was what i was really you know becoming a part of in a really big way in that regard and you know the pandemic caused a lot of strain on our staff on our company culture and that strain led into kind of the closing of our you know our women's program uh this time last year in november and there was just a lot of hurtful things and fear that was created for myself in the process and to come into 2021 and to have you come into the role of chief um operating officer as well too which has just been a tremendous value to this company culture i think collectively there's a lot of people missing in this room who've contributed to the success of the company in the last year and the continuation of our mission to save lives um but we showed up in a big way and i think we've learned how to uh manage a company culture in a way that we've never done as a you know kind of thinking of what you were stating chris there's a there's a certain immaturity that takes place for young you know business owners and leaders in that regard and you just don't see everything that you could be taught in you know a master's program and so forth in business and school and um so to be here in this state to be serving women again in programming to have a robust iop program that i think is just invaluably serving that side of our patient demographic to have the health to look forward as leaders in the organization to our team meetings and everything that's brought to us in those moments just grateful and thankful because i really do feel like i'm a part of something special and it's out of that energy that we continue forward with quality care and saving people's lives each and every day and just profoundly filled with uh yeah gratitude for all of that so thanks friend all right top all that yeah jeez that's a it's a high bar all right well i will do my best deep into the field i'm gonna have to crack that door open all right here we go uh like you guys mentioned um it was a year ago almost exactly this week that the women's program closed um and it was actually a year ago uh last week that i started so i i walking into a new job into a new role into a new company and within days having about 30 percent of it shut down and watching staff go away and and seeing this and seeing um a real true impact of what a pandemic can do to not only to a business but just to individual lives and the way that it impacted um people in need who didn't have access to treatment because of that was that was really pretty poignant for me and um i had a very real moment where i had to ask myself should i stay and it was uh yeah and i decided that i believed in this place i just started but i for some reason i just knew that it was the right move and i am extremely grateful that i made the right decision so thank you guys thank you thank you absolutely well i love you guys glad we could take this opportunity to share in this special moment together and you know celebrate uh thanksgiving and our what we're grateful for here at peaks and you know again as we uh go into the holidays collectively all together in this regard you know give grace to your loved ones addiction and mental health is a real thing um i know not all families experience it but many families do and so just give your loved ones grace and there is hope there's places like peaks other excellent opportunities out there on the other side of the holidays in that regard to get help for your loved one in that regard so um love you all thank you so much for being with us for walking through these episodes with us and uh looking forward to the next episode on the other side of the holidays take care everybody happy thanksgiving happy thanksgiving</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq-child --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p><!-- wp:block {"ref":1510} /--></p>

Episode 29: Family Shame & Addiction 2021/11/15, 20:42
Episode 29: Family Shame & Addiction

<p> <!-- wp:cover {"url":"https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg","id":4918,"dimRatio":0,"focalPoint":{"x":"0.52","y":"0.50"},"align":"center","className":"nvd-bg-div"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-cover aligncenter nvd-bg-div"><img class="img-responsive" class= "wp-block-cover__image-background wp-image-4918" alt="" src= "https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg" style="object-position:52% 50%" data-object-fit="cover" data-object-position="52% 50%" /> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","level":1,"textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --> <h1 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-episode-29">Episode 29</h1> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --></p> <h2 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-family-shame-addiction">Family Shame & Addiction</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cover --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"162286ea","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/columns {"block_id":"76ccc0a0","classMigrate":true,"leftPadding":0,"rightPadding":0} --> <div class="uagb-columns__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-columns__inner-wrap uagb-columns__columns-2"> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"492391e5","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-492391e5"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-watch-now">Watch Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:embed 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/wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"2fed02a0","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-29-1">Episode 29</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Our Family Recovery Coach, Lisa Smith is back on our show to discuss family shame and how to journey through this difficult emotion.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Topics:</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph --></p> <p>Jason and Lisa explain what the difference is between embarrassment, guilt, and shame<br /> When a family member feels shame and what that looks like in different scenarios<br /> The entrapment of shame within substance abuse<br /> How do we shift a family behavior that has been passed down generations?</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"242fb511","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#225b67"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","style":{"color":{"text":"#fff351"}}} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center has-text-color" id= "h-select-quotes" style="color:#fff351">Select Quotes</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/blockquote {"block_id":"5c9ca7e9","classMigrate":true,"descriptionText":"If we can go up the river a little bit as a family and speak what we feel, what we fear, what we are disappointed in, and what we need, a little bit up the river maybe that person who is struggling can reach out to us and we can pull them out before they get further. Or maybe they can even grab onto a branch that’s hanging and can get themselves out because they are seeing how their family is dealing with their own shame and emotions. That can stop the generational passing of it.","descColor":"#ffffff","author":" Lisa Smith, BA MME, CCAR Certified Family Recovery Coach\u003cbr\u003e","authorColor":"#ffffff","enableTweet":false} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-blockquote uagb-blockquote__outer-wrap uagb-block-5c9ca7e9"> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__wrap uagb-blockquote__skin-border uagb-blockquote__stack-img-none"> <blockquote class="uagb-blockquote"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content-wrap"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content">If we can go up the river a little bit as a family and speak what we feel, what we fear, what we are disappointed in, and what we need, a little bit up the river maybe that person who is struggling can reach out to us and we can pull them out before they get further. Or maybe they can even grab onto a branch that’s hanging and can get themselves out because they are seeing how their family is dealing with their own shame and emotions. That can stop the generational passing of it.</div> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__author-wrap uagb-blockquote__author-at-left"> <cite class="uagb-blockquote__author"> Lisa Smith, BA MME, CCAR Certified Family Recovery Coach<br /></cite></div> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/blockquote --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"797668d6","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"none","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-transcripts"> Episode Transcripts</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/faq {"block_id":"272a8dbd","schema":"{\u0022@context\u0022:\u0022https://schema.org\u0022,\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022FAQPage\u0022,\u0022@id\u0022:\u0022https://peaksrecovery.com/blog/uncategorized/ep-29/\u0022,\u0022mainEntity\u0022:[{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Question\u0022,\u0022name\u0022:\u0022Episode 29 Transcript\u0022,\u0022acceptedAnswer\u0022:{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Answer\u0022,\u0022text\u0022:\u0022\u003cbr\u003ehello everyone and welcome to finding peaks my name is jason friesma i'm the chief clinical officer at peaks recovery centers here in colorado springs and sitting with me guest today is lisa smith family recovery coach with reclaim and recover she joined us i don't know a few weeks ago and and we had just started kind of having some good conversation and so i decided i wanted to have lisa back and um dive into the the shallow end of the pool and talk about shame and families um before the show we were just kind of talking about that this is a challenging topic and i think it's challenging because um well obviously shame is difficult to talk about and i think it would be helpful if i kind of start by talking about what shame is a little bit and and then how i see it in the family and then maybe you could talk about how you see it in families too as you're coaching them but um just really quick uh shame guilt embarrassment these these words kind of get tossed around and intermix quite a bit but you know clearly they're very different terms and um embarrassment is uh some people say things are embarrassing and really they're probably much more shameful or guilt-ridden but embarrassing is just something kind of light that happens that people are going to laugh off later like leaving your fly down during a presentation or something that's embarrassing and guilt is feeling bad about something you have done and then shame is feeling bad about who you are right and everyone that i've ever talked to that has kids for instance has a i'm a bad mom or i'm a bad dad shame button yeah and and that shame button um i don't care how good a parent they are everybody has it because they have moments where they feel like they could have shown up differently um and that almost inevitably can lead to people feeling a great deal of shame is what i've noticed and then it leads to all kinds of interesting behavior because shame also tells us to not talk about it right to keep keep this a secret or hide it or people knew that i was feeling so shameful they wouldn't want to be in relationship with me and so it leads to all of this kind of externalization of shame and shame comes out in all these really weird places and so that's what i've observed i'm wondering kind of how you see shame in the family recovery coaching yeah realm yes um all of that so i agree um in working with families one of the things that frequently i say is it's okay to feel guilty um and it's okay for your person to feel guilty about their behaviors because if their behaviors are hurtful um to themselves or other people we should know that they're hurtful to other people and that's okay and i think as parents sometimes we feel shame when our kids feel guilty um and that's an important it's an important lesson it's a natural consequence of hurting somebody is to feel guilt about that and that's how we learn to do better and to show up better so guilt and shame sometimes get blurred i think and um understanding the difference between guilt and shame i think is super important now shame on the family side of things um gosh when you've got a person who's um you know got a a substance use disorder there's a lot of going back and thinking you know how could i have done this differently what did i miss you know what what did i do wrong and there's that piece of the shame and then there's um the shame of who they are and how it's a reflection on you yeah um and that's probably i think that's harder than um even you know could i have shown up differently because as as parents you just sort of you work through that like you know i wish my kid didn't fall off his bike and you know i could have caught them and um but how is my child or my spouse a reflection on me and carrying that shame um just it makes you walk through life silence and pushes everybody out of it which isolates you even more and isolates them even more which is the opposite of what both people need in that environment yeah i think i think you bring up some good points too that um what what i watch parents in particular do and sometimes spouses is when they they might not even be thinking about it but it kind of as a internal dialogue i watch parents in particular feeling shame about like hey my my daughter is an alcoholic and i feel like i did something wrong this is exposing that i feel like i'm a bad father i'm a bad mother and so i'm going to try to either prevent that from happening i'm going to try to prevent other people from knowing about it or i'm just going to create kind of this high intensity high pressure world where people can't see that i'm a bad parent because it feels bad when people notice that that i made these terrible mistakes and that i'm a bad parent yeah yeah and it and i and i've watched it really lead to i think the result of that is parents or other family members becoming really hyper controlling and really afraid which usually does lead to control that fear always leads to control um where family members just um well they they try to just control the behavior instead of kind of letting a person as you said kind of walk through their own guilt and all that yeah and in today's world with the social media presence right like so there's these images that we're supposed to be and um i think that the\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003enobody has those actual images in their household and we all sort of can intellectualize that but that's all you see and at key points in development you know in people's development like graduating high school going to college getting married getting a job picking a career kind of those transitional times when your child is not meeting those milestones and you're and everyone's putting it out there it's like here's all the things that we're doing we're at the state championships and we're doing graduation and we got these awards and this scholarship we're doing these great things and you're just trying to keep your your person safe um that's you know you feel disappointment you feel let down there's all sorts of and then you feel bad about feeling those things because you're trying to help them so the shame is just super deep and there it feels like nobody else is going through it and there's so many people there's so many people going through it um so you know kind of reaching out and one of the things that um about shame is silence just feeds it um the more silent you are the more that shame continues to talk in your head like this you're terrible this is bad this this is a disappointment this is a shame this is this is you're a terrible parent how how are you here and you can't get out of it because there is no connection with somebody else might be actually going through this and can sit with me yeah that is such the trap of shame is that right it does say i'm just going to suffer alone and and i may have shared this on finding peaks once but i i've sat in a group with people and um said i want everybody who feels like they're the worst person in the world to raise their hand and like at least half the group every time raises their hand that they feel that way and i'm it's got to be the same in a lot of families too we're like who feels like they're the best or worst mom or dad in the world that your loved one is dealing with uh substance use or mental health issues and i'm sure most of them literally think the billions of people on planet earth they're the worst yeah um and i watch it happen all the time and and so when somebody's constantly telling themselves that i'm a bad parent and i'm a bad parent um that that usually leads to honestly a disconnect in the relationship with their person yeah and and usually uh a really uncomfortable disconnect and i i wonder how you've seen that in in your coaching yeah a hundred percent um so the shame involved with substance use is huge um i mean people who um have the disease of addiction live in shame all the time they feel that they've disappointed everybody and missed all the opportunities and they're a terrible person and i i say this um and i'm i'm sticking to it i don't think that there's one person in addiction that thinks i know this is this is what i thought would happen this is where i thought this was going to take me um and so the shame of like now i'm here and i can't get out is terrible so when a family feels shame their person sees it they can see their disconnect they can see them pouring themselves into work and disconnecting from relationships they can see unhealthy behaviors that are occurring in the home or with their parents or where their spouse they can see that relationships are within the household are disjunct and disconnecting because in if we connect then we have to admit that there's something there and and sometimes it just feels easier to stay disconnected and so i think that that's actually like throwing extra shame on to the person with the problem um and when a family member can identify that shame and sit with it and call it something and ask for help and ask for someone to just be with me in this moment not only does it model to their person that it's okay to ask for help and and to be vulnerable but i'm taking you off of my plate i'm taking your behavior off of my shame platter and just gonna deal with my own stuff and love you separately from the behavior that i feel is causing me shame\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eand you and i were talking kind of before we started as well just about kind of the legacy of shame like how um how it kind of trickles down not even flows down uh generation of generation um and i was thinking about that even since we talked about it um my wife works a lot with kids with dyslexia and oftentimes when you you can just follow really negative educational experiences in families usually back generations and generations because probably a lot of those people likely had dyslexia too so they overcompensated and felt really in a lot of shame about feeling stupid or or whatever it might be and it just gets past all that pressure kind of just passes down generation to generation and it does take finally somebody to dig their heels in and say hey we got to stop this transmission of shame um from from one family to uh generation to the next yeah speak to that yeah i think that's so big and you know the the idea of how do we how do we fix this problem how how do we continue to have um you know the number of people falling into substance use that we have and the numbers just keep getting bigger exponentially and i don't have the answer to all the questions i think you know that's a that's deep but um one thing that i have been thinking about recently is what's my piece in it as a family member well my piece is speaking it and and stopping it today so in order to do that i've got to kind of admit to my own shame and sit with that for a second but um if families can i was you know using the example of we're pulling people out of the river and they're coming down and it's like rapids coming down and there's just so many people needing help and there's just not enough there's not enough help in enough time so if if we can go up the river a little bit um as a family and and speak what we feel and what what we fear and and what we are disappointed in and what we need a little bit further up the river maybe that person who's struggling can reach out to us and we can pull them out before they get further or maybe they can even grab onto a you know a stick or something that's hanging and they can get themselves out because they see how we're dealing with our own\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eour own shame and that will stop the generational passing of it i mean when you were talking earlier about um you know especially families that are high functioning and and doing really well um socioeconomically it's like we aren't those people um i i i think i probably said that we aren't those people um i don't know if i said those exact words but i i definitely gave that image how is that a shame yeah that's terrible we aren't those people well okay well yeah we are actually yeah i mean that's just saying that you know that's something that that lesser people do and if you're doing that then you're a lesser person um and that's just not how addiction works it's just you know it it knows no boundaries i mean it just it'll get anybody so um you know being able to say well maybe we are those people and i was telling you i have this analogy when i was a kid um because i'm old um there used to be high dives at swimming pools yeah yeah so there used to be good old days the good old days not only are there not high tides but i don't even think there's diving boards most places but there used to be high dives right and i've always had this like one desire for\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eadventure and thrill and two a fear of heights so i would go to the swimming pool i hung out at the swimming pool a lot and i would many times walk up the ladder and then you know everyone has to wait at the bottom with the high dive right and because sometimes you have to come back down the ladder that's probably why they took a walk of shame coming back and having to go down the ladder like i'm not going off the high dock so i did that enough times but i loved it i actually really loved the high dive but i was afraid of it as well so i did it enough times that what i developed was this watch mentality so i would stand and i would watch for a while and then i'd go play and come back and stand watch all these kids going off the high dev and i would just watch and watch and watch and then finally after watching enough kids go off the high dive i'd say they all did that i think i think i can do that i think i'm ready to do that too and i'd go up the high dive and sometimes it was scary but i would go off the hideout because i knew they were okay they went off the high dive that everyone was okay and they seemed to like it so i'm going to do it too and i think that really similarly with shame like gosh if you speak it other people are watching someone else might be watching and and they might not even tell you but in their head they're going oh me too me too this is this is my story too and because you spoke it because you sat with it and you dealt with it um and i saw that you you got through it um i can i can say it too and we can get better and that's how you stop kind of that generational passing because i i really do think that um you know our culture and our society has just become one of putting out an image that is unreachable and um that's not helping us no and it's exponentially making that sense of shame in people stay longer yeah and i couldn't agree with you more so just excuse me to pivot just as we end here um could you kind of talk about reclaim and recover and what it is you do specifically and how uh you maybe combat family shame yeah day to day yeah yeah we address shame every day yeah that was in my tagline yeah um right so i work with families i'm a certified family recovery coach i work with families um in various stages of um loving somebody in the disease of addiction um so sometimes that's people who you know their person is in active use and they're they're trying to help them and they're trying to um just kind of get their life back and and live their life as opposed to surviving it because that's what it feels like sometimes that process can be so long i work with with families whose loved ones in early recovery working on that transitional approach and really changing the patterns that infiltrated the system when the illness kind of came into the family and how those patterns didn't don't serve any of us anymore so let's change let's change the patterns let's change our perspective let's change our mentality and communication um and then um yeah so it's it's kind of twofold working on the the family members really learning how to show up the way that they want to show up how to establish boundaries in the way that boundaries are effective and learn how to communicate with their person and release maybe some of the control that was developed over the course of the addiction and then sometimes it's also just doing some triage and kind of helping families figure out how do i get my person into treatment how do i invite them to get help how do i connect with them while they're in active use so that their journey is honored um regardless of the outcome and that's what i do awesome what i really i just want to tell you i just think the way that you think about and talk about families you work with is so filled with uh empathy and compassion um i'm confident that the work you're doing is really helping to alleviate a lot of that shame that families have to walk through uh in early recovery and it's a gift and um i i've really enjoyed working with you thank you um here at peaks so uh with that um we're going to sign off today on this episode of finding peaks um i invite you to follow us on instagram facebook spotify i don't know wherever you get your podcast apple the apple store anyway have a good one and we'll see in a week\u0022}}]}"} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq uagb-faq__outer-wrap uagb-block-272a8dbd uagb-faq-icon-row uagb-faq-layout-accordion uagb-faq-expand-first-false uagb-faq-inactive-other-true uagb-faq-equal-height" data-faqtoggle="true" role="tablist"> <div class="uagb-faq__wrap uagb-buttons-layout-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/faq-child {"block_id":"2dcef4d9","question":"Episode 29 Transcript","answer":"\u003cbr\u003ehello everyone and welcome to finding peaks my name is jason friesma i'm the chief clinical officer at peaks recovery centers here in colorado springs and sitting with me guest today is lisa smith family recovery coach with reclaim and recover she joined us i don't know a few weeks ago and and we had just started kind of having some good conversation and so i decided i wanted to have lisa back and um dive into the the shallow end of the pool and talk about shame and families um before the show we were just kind of talking about that this is a challenging topic and i think it's challenging because um well obviously shame is difficult to talk about and i think it would be helpful if i kind of start by talking about what shame is a little bit and and then how i see it in the family and then maybe you could talk about how you see it in families too as you're coaching them but um just really quick uh shame guilt embarrassment these these words kind of get tossed around and intermix quite a bit but you know clearly they're very different terms and um embarrassment is uh some people say things are embarrassing and really they're probably much more shameful or guilt-ridden but embarrassing is just something kind of light that happens that people are going to laugh off later like leaving your fly down during a presentation or something that's embarrassing and guilt is feeling bad about something you have done and then shame is feeling bad about who you are right and everyone that i've ever talked to that has kids for instance has a i'm a bad mom or i'm a bad dad shame button yeah and and that shame button um i don't care how good a parent they are everybody has it because they have moments where they feel like they could have shown up differently um and that almost inevitably can lead to people feeling a great deal of shame is what i've noticed and then it leads to all kinds of interesting behavior because shame also tells us to not talk about it right to keep keep this a secret or hide it or people knew that i was feeling so shameful they wouldn't want to be in relationship with me and so it leads to all of this kind of externalization of shame and shame comes out in all these really weird places and so that's what i've observed i'm wondering kind of how you see shame in the family recovery coaching yeah realm yes um all of that so i agree um in working with families one of the things that frequently i say is it's okay to feel guilty um and it's okay for your person to feel guilty about their behaviors because if their behaviors are hurtful um to themselves or other people we should know that they're hurtful to other people and that's okay and i think as parents sometimes we feel shame when our kids feel guilty um and that's an important it's an important lesson it's a natural consequence of hurting somebody is to feel guilt about that and that's how we learn to do better and to show up better so guilt and shame sometimes get blurred i think and um understanding the difference between guilt and shame i think is super important now shame on the family side of things um gosh when you've got a person who's um you know got a a substance use disorder there's a lot of going back and thinking you know how could i have done this differently what did i miss you know what what did i do wrong and there's that piece of the shame and then there's um the shame of who they are and how it's a reflection on you yeah um and that's probably i think that's harder than um even you know could i have shown up differently because as as parents you just sort of you work through that like you know i wish my kid didn't fall off his bike and you know i could have caught them and um but how is my child or my spouse a reflection on me and carrying that shame um just it makes you walk through life silence and pushes everybody out of it which isolates you even more and isolates them even more which is the opposite of what both people need in that environment yeah i think i think you bring up some good points too that um what what i watch parents in particular do and sometimes spouses is when they they might not even be thinking about it but it kind of as a internal dialogue i watch parents in particular feeling shame about like hey my my daughter is an alcoholic and i feel like i did something wrong this is exposing that i feel like i'm a bad father i'm a bad mother and so i'm going to try to either prevent that from happening i'm going to try to prevent other people from knowing about it or i'm just going to create kind of this high intensity high pressure world where people can't see that i'm a bad parent because it feels bad when people notice that that i made these terrible mistakes and that i'm a bad parent yeah yeah and it and i and i've watched it really lead to i think the result of that is parents or other family members becoming really hyper controlling and really afraid which usually does lead to control that fear always leads to control um where family members just um well they they try to just control the behavior instead of kind of letting a person as you said kind of walk through their own guilt and all that yeah and in today's world with the social media presence right like so there's these images that we're supposed to be and um i think that the\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003enobody has those actual images in their household and we all sort of can intellectualize that but that's all you see and at key points in development you know in people's development like graduating high school going to college getting married getting a job picking a career kind of those transitional times when your child is not meeting those milestones and you're and everyone's putting it out there it's like here's all the things that we're doing we're at the state championships and we're doing graduation and we got these awards and this scholarship we're doing these great things and you're just trying to keep your your person safe um that's you know you feel disappointment you feel let down there's all sorts of and then you feel bad about feeling those things because you're trying to help them so the shame is just super deep and there it feels like nobody else is going through it and there's so many people there's so many people going through it um so you know kind of reaching out and one of the things that um about shame is silence just feeds it um the more silent you are the more that shame continues to talk in your head like this you're terrible this is bad this this is a disappointment this is a shame this is this is you're a terrible parent how how are you here and you can't get out of it because there is no connection with somebody else might be actually going through this and can sit with me yeah that is such the trap of shame is that right it does say i'm just going to suffer alone and and i may have shared this on finding peaks once but i i've sat in a group with people and um said i want everybody who feels like they're the worst person in the world to raise their hand and like at least half the group every time raises their hand that they feel that way and i'm it's got to be the same in a lot of families too we're like who feels like they're the best or worst mom or dad in the world that your loved one is dealing with uh substance use or mental health issues and i'm sure most of them literally think the billions of people on planet earth they're the worst yeah um and i watch it happen all the time and and so when somebody's constantly telling themselves that i'm a bad parent and i'm a bad parent um that that usually leads to honestly a disconnect in the relationship with their person yeah and and usually uh a really uncomfortable disconnect and i i wonder how you've seen that in in your coaching yeah a hundred percent um so the shame involved with substance use is huge um i mean people who um have the disease of addiction live in shame all the time they feel that they've disappointed everybody and missed all the opportunities and they're a terrible person and i i say this um and i'm i'm sticking to it i don't think that there's one person in addiction that thinks i know this is this is what i thought would happen this is where i thought this was going to take me um and so the shame of like now i'm here and i can't get out is terrible so when a family feels shame their person sees it they can see their disconnect they can see them pouring themselves into work and disconnecting from relationships they can see unhealthy behaviors that are occurring in the home or with their parents or where their spouse they can see that relationships are within the household are disjunct and disconnecting because in if we connect then we have to admit that there's something there and and sometimes it just feels easier to stay disconnected and so i think that that's actually like throwing extra shame on to the person with the problem um and when a family member can identify that shame and sit with it and call it something and ask for help and ask for someone to just be with me in this moment not only does it model to their person that it's okay to ask for help and and to be vulnerable but i'm taking you off of my plate i'm taking your behavior off of my shame platter and just gonna deal with my own stuff and love you separately from the behavior that i feel is causing me shame\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eand you and i were talking kind of before we started as well just about kind of the legacy of shame like how um how it kind of trickles down not even flows down uh generation of generation um and i was thinking about that even since we talked about it um my wife works a lot with kids with dyslexia and oftentimes when you you can just follow really negative educational experiences in families usually back generations and generations because probably a lot of those people likely had dyslexia too so they overcompensated and felt really in a lot of shame about feeling stupid or or whatever it might be and it just gets past all that pressure kind of just passes down generation to generation and it does take finally somebody to dig their heels in and say hey we got to stop this transmission of shame um from from one family to uh generation to the next yeah speak to that yeah i think that's so big and you know the the idea of how do we how do we fix this problem how how do we continue to have um you know the number of people falling into substance use that we have and the numbers just keep getting bigger exponentially and i don't have the answer to all the questions i think you know that's a that's deep but um one thing that i have been thinking about recently is what's my piece in it as a family member well my piece is speaking it and and stopping it today so in order to do that i've got to kind of admit to my own shame and sit with that for a second but um if families can i was you know using the example of we're pulling people out of the river and they're coming down and it's like rapids coming down and there's just so many people needing help and there's just not enough there's not enough help in enough time so if if we can go up the river a little bit um as a family and and speak what we feel and what what we fear and and what we are disappointed in and what we need a little bit further up the river maybe that person who's struggling can reach out to us and we can pull them out before they get further or maybe they can even grab onto a you know a stick or something that's hanging and they can get themselves out because they see how we're dealing with our own\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eour own shame and that will stop the generational passing of it i mean when you were talking earlier about um you know especially families that are high functioning and and doing really well um socioeconomically it's like we aren't those people um i i i think i probably said that we aren't those people um i don't know if i said those exact words but i i definitely gave that image how is that a shame yeah that's terrible we aren't those people well okay well yeah we are actually yeah i mean that's just saying that you know that's something that that lesser people do and if you're doing that then you're a lesser person um and that's just not how addiction works it's just you know it it knows no boundaries i mean it just it'll get anybody so um you know being able to say well maybe we are those people and i was telling you i have this analogy when i was a kid um because i'm old um there used to be high dives at swimming pools yeah yeah so there used to be good old days the good old days not only are there not high tides but i don't even think there's diving boards most places but there used to be high dives right and i've always had this like one desire for\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eadventure and thrill and two a fear of heights so i would go to the swimming pool i hung out at the swimming pool a lot and i would many times walk up the ladder and then you know everyone has to wait at the bottom with the high dive right and because sometimes you have to come back down the ladder that's probably why they took a walk of shame coming back and having to go down the ladder like i'm not going off the high dock so i did that enough times but i loved it i actually really loved the high dive but i was afraid of it as well so i did it enough times that what i developed was this watch mentality so i would stand and i would watch for a while and then i'd go play and come back and stand watch all these kids going off the high dev and i would just watch and watch and watch and then finally after watching enough kids go off the high dive i'd say they all did that i think i think i can do that i think i'm ready to do that too and i'd go up the high dive and sometimes it was scary but i would go off the hideout because i knew they were okay they went off the high dive that everyone was okay and they seemed to like it so i'm going to do it too and i think that really similarly with shame like gosh if you speak it other people are watching someone else might be watching and and they might not even tell you but in their head they're going oh me too me too this is this is my story too and because you spoke it because you sat with it and you dealt with it um and i saw that you you got through it um i can i can say it too and we can get better and that's how you stop kind of that generational passing because i i really do think that um you know our culture and our society has just become one of putting out an image that is unreachable and um that's not helping us no and it's exponentially making that sense of shame in people stay longer yeah and i couldn't agree with you more so just excuse me to pivot just as we end here um could you kind of talk about reclaim and recover and what it is you do specifically and how uh you maybe combat family shame yeah day to day yeah yeah we address shame every day yeah that was in my tagline yeah um right so i work with families i'm a certified family recovery coach i work with families um in various stages of um loving somebody in the disease of addiction um so sometimes that's people who you know their person is in active use and they're they're trying to help them and they're trying to um just kind of get their life back and and live their life as opposed to surviving it because that's what it feels like sometimes that process can be so long i work with with families whose loved ones in early recovery working on that transitional approach and really changing the patterns that infiltrated the system when the illness kind of came into the family and how those patterns didn't don't serve any of us anymore so let's change let's change the patterns let's change our perspective let's change our mentality and communication um and then um yeah so it's it's kind of twofold working on the the family members really learning how to show up the way that they want to show up how to establish boundaries in the way that boundaries are effective and learn how to communicate with their person and release maybe some of the control that was developed over the course of the addiction and then sometimes it's also just doing some triage and kind of helping families figure out how do i get my person into treatment how do i invite them to get help how do i connect with them while they're in active use so that their journey is honored um regardless of the outcome and that's what i do awesome what i really i just want to tell you i just think the way that you think about and talk about families you work with is so filled with uh empathy and compassion um i'm confident that the work you're doing is really helping to alleviate a lot of that shame that families have to walk through uh in early recovery and it's a gift and um i i've really enjoyed working with you thank you um here at peaks so uh with that um we're going to sign off today on this episode of finding peaks um i invite you to follow us on instagram facebook spotify i don't know wherever you get your podcast apple the apple store anyway have a good one and we'll see in a week"} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq-child uagb-faq-child__outer-wrap uagb-block-2dcef4d9"> <div class="uagb-faq-child__wrapper"> <div class="uagb-faq-item" role="tab"> <div class="uagb-faq-questions-button uagb-faq-questions"> <span class="uagb-question">Episode 29 Transcript</span></div> <div class="uagb-faq-content"><span><br /> <br /></span> <p><span>hello everyone and welcome to finding peaks my name is jason friesma i'm the chief clinical officer at peaks recovery centers here in colorado springs and sitting with me guest today is lisa smith family recovery coach with reclaim and recover she joined us i don't know a few weeks ago and and we had just started kind of having some good conversation and so i decided i wanted to have lisa back and um dive into the the shallow end of the pool and talk about shame and families um before the show we were just kind of talking about that this is a challenging topic and i think it's challenging because um well obviously shame is difficult to talk about and i think it would be helpful if i kind of start by talking about what shame is a little bit and and then how i see it in the family and then maybe you could talk about how you see it in families too as you're coaching them but um just really quick uh shame guilt embarrassment these these words kind of get tossed around and intermix quite a bit but you know clearly they're very different terms and um embarrassment is uh some people say things are embarrassing and really they're probably much more shameful or guilt-ridden but embarrassing is just something kind of light that happens that people are going to laugh off later like leaving your fly down during a presentation or something that's embarrassing and guilt is feeling bad about something you have done and then shame is feeling bad about who you are right and everyone that i've ever talked to that has kids for instance has a i'm a bad mom or i'm a bad dad shame button yeah and and that shame button um i don't care how good a parent they are everybody has it because they have moments where they feel like they could have shown up differently um and that almost inevitably can lead to people feeling a great deal of shame is what i've noticed and then it leads to all kinds of interesting behavior because shame also tells us to not talk about it right to keep keep this a secret or hide it or people knew that i was feeling so shameful they wouldn't want to be in relationship with me and so it leads to all of this kind of externalization of shame and shame comes out in all these really weird places and so that's what i've observed i'm wondering kind of how you see shame in the family recovery coaching yeah realm yes um all of that so i agree um in working with families one of the things that frequently i say is it's okay to feel guilty um and it's okay for your person to feel guilty about their behaviors because if their behaviors are hurtful um to themselves or other people we should know that they're hurtful to other people and that's okay and i think as parents sometimes we feel shame when our kids feel guilty um and that's an important it's an important lesson it's a natural consequence of hurting somebody is to feel guilt about that and that's how we learn to do better and to show up better so guilt and shame sometimes get blurred i think and um understanding the difference between guilt and shame i think is super important now shame on the family side of things um gosh when you've got a person who's um you know got a a substance use disorder there's a lot of going back and thinking you know how could i have done this differently what did i miss you know what what did i do wrong and there's that piece of the shame and then there's um the shame of who they are and how it's a reflection on you yeah um and that's probably i think that's harder than um even you know could i have shown up differently because as as parents you just sort of you work through that like you know i wish my kid didn't fall off his bike and you know i could have caught them and um but how is my child or my spouse a reflection on me and carrying that shame um just it makes you walk through life silence and pushes everybody out of it which isolates you even more and isolates them even more which is the opposite of what both people need in that environment yeah i think i think you bring up some good points too that um what what i watch parents in particular do and sometimes spouses is when they they might not even be thinking about it but it kind of as a internal dialogue i watch parents in particular feeling shame about like hey my my daughter is an alcoholic and i feel like i did something wrong this is exposing that i feel like i'm a bad father i'm a bad mother and so i'm going to try to either prevent that from happening i'm going to try to prevent other people from knowing about it or i'm just going to create kind of this high intensity high pressure world where people can't see that i'm a bad parent because it feels bad when people notice that that i made these terrible mistakes and that i'm a bad parent yeah yeah and it and i and i've watched it really lead to i think the result of that is parents or other family members becoming really hyper controlling and really afraid which usually does lead to control that fear always leads to control um where family members just um well they they try to just control the behavior instead of kind of letting a person as you said kind of walk through their own guilt and all that yeah and in today's world with the social media presence right like so there's these images that we're supposed to be and um i think that the</span></p> <p><span>nobody has those actual images in their household and we all sort of can intellectualize that but that's all you see and at key points in development you know in people's development like graduating high school going to college getting married getting a job picking a career kind of those transitional times when your child is not meeting those milestones and you're and everyone's putting it out there it's like here's all the things that we're doing we're at the state championships and we're doing graduation and we got these awards and this scholarship we're doing these great things and you're just trying to keep your your person safe um that's you know you feel disappointment you feel let down there's all sorts of and then you feel bad about feeling those things because you're trying to help them so the shame is just super deep and there it feels like nobody else is going through it and there's so many people there's so many people going through it um so you know kind of reaching out and one of the things that um about shame is silence just feeds it um the more silent you are the more that shame continues to talk in your head like this you're terrible this is bad this this is a disappointment this is a shame this is this is you're a terrible parent how how are you here and you can't get out of it because there is no connection with somebody else might be actually going through this and can sit with me yeah that is such the trap of shame is that right it does say i'm just going to suffer alone and and i may have shared this on finding peaks once but i i've sat in a group with people and um said i want everybody who feels like they're the worst person in the world to raise their hand and like at least half the group every time raises their hand that they feel that way and i'm it's got to be the same in a lot of families too we're like who feels like they're the best or worst mom or dad in the world that your loved one is dealing with uh substance use or mental health issues and i'm sure most of them literally think the billions of people on planet earth they're the worst yeah um and i watch it happen all the time and and so when somebody's constantly telling themselves that i'm a bad parent and i'm a bad parent um that that usually leads to honestly a disconnect in the relationship with their person yeah and and usually uh a really uncomfortable disconnect and i i wonder how you've seen that in in your coaching yeah a hundred percent um so the shame involved with substance use is huge um i mean people who um have the disease of addiction live in shame all the time they feel that they've disappointed everybody and missed all the opportunities and they're a terrible person and i i say this um and i'm i'm sticking to it i don't think that there's one person in addiction that thinks i know this is this is what i thought would happen this is where i thought this was going to take me um and so the shame of like now i'm here and i can't get out is terrible so when a family feels shame their person sees it they can see their disconnect they can see them pouring themselves into work and disconnecting from relationships they can see unhealthy behaviors that are occurring in the home or with their parents or where their spouse they can see that relationships are within the household are disjunct and disconnecting because in if we connect then we have to admit that there's something there and and sometimes it just feels easier to stay disconnected and so i think that that's actually like throwing extra shame on to the person with the problem um and when a family member can identify that shame and sit with it and call it something and ask for help and ask for someone to just be with me in this moment not only does it model to their person that it's okay to ask for help and and to be vulnerable but i'm taking you off of my plate i'm taking your behavior off of my shame platter and just gonna deal with my own stuff and love you separately from the behavior that i feel is causing me shame</span></p> <p><span>and you and i were talking kind of before we started as well just about kind of the legacy of shame like how um how it kind of trickles down not even flows down uh generation of generation um and i was thinking about that even since we talked about it um my wife works a lot with kids with dyslexia and oftentimes when you you can just follow really negative educational experiences in families usually back generations and generations because probably a lot of those people likely had dyslexia too so they overcompensated and felt really in a lot of shame about feeling stupid or or whatever it might be and it just gets past all that pressure kind of just passes down generation to generation and it does take finally somebody to dig their heels in and say hey we got to stop this transmission of shame um from from one family to uh generation to the next yeah speak to that yeah i think that's so big and you know the the idea of how do we how do we fix this problem how how do we continue to have um you know the number of people falling into substance use that we have and the numbers just keep getting bigger exponentially and i don't have the answer to all the questions i think you know that's a that's deep but um one thing that i have been thinking about recently is what's my piece in it as a family member well my piece is speaking it and and stopping it today so in order to do that i've got to kind of admit to my own shame and sit with that for a second but um if families can i was you know using the example of we're pulling people out of the river and they're coming down and it's like rapids coming down and there's just so many people needing help and there's just not enough there's not enough help in enough time so if if we can go up the river a little bit um as a family and and speak what we feel and what what we fear and and what we are disappointed in and what we need a little bit further up the river maybe that person who's struggling can reach out to us and we can pull them out before they get further or maybe they can even grab onto a you know a stick or something that's hanging and they can get themselves out because they see how we're dealing with our own</span></p> <p><span>our own shame and that will stop the generational passing of it i mean when you were talking earlier about um you know especially families that are high functioning and and doing really well um socioeconomically it's like we aren't those people um i i i think i probably said that we aren't those people um i don't know if i said those exact words but i i definitely gave that image how is that a shame yeah that's terrible we aren't those people well okay well yeah we are actually yeah i mean that's just saying that you know that's something that that lesser people do and if you're doing that then you're a lesser person um and that's just not how addiction works it's just you know it it knows no boundaries i mean it just it'll get anybody so um you know being able to say well maybe we are those people and i was telling you i have this analogy when i was a kid um because i'm old um there used to be high dives at swimming pools yeah yeah so there used to be good old days the good old days not only are there not high tides but i don't even think there's diving boards most places but there used to be high dives right and i've always had this like one desire for</span></p> <p><span>adventure and thrill and two a fear of heights so i would go to the swimming pool i hung out at the swimming pool a lot and i would many times walk up the ladder and then you know everyone has to wait at the bottom with the high dive right and because sometimes you have to come back down the ladder that's probably why they took a walk of shame coming back and having to go down the ladder like i'm not going off the high dock so i did that enough times but i loved it i actually really loved the high dive but i was afraid of it as well so i did it enough times that what i developed was this watch mentality so i would stand and i would watch for a while and then i'd go play and come back and stand watch all these kids going off the high dev and i would just watch and watch and watch and then finally after watching enough kids go off the high dive i'd say they all did that i think i think i can do that i think i'm ready to do that too and i'd go up the high dive and sometimes it was scary but i would go off the hideout because i knew they were okay they went off the high dive that everyone was okay and they seemed to like it so i'm going to do it too and i think that really similarly with shame like gosh if you speak it other people are watching someone else might be watching and and they might not even tell you but in their head they're going oh me too me too this is this is my story too and because you spoke it because you sat with it and you dealt with it um and i saw that you you got through it um i can i can say it too and we can get better and that's how you stop kind of that generational passing because i i really do think that um you know our culture and our society has just become one of putting out an image that is unreachable and um that's not helping us no and it's exponentially making that sense of shame in people stay longer yeah and i couldn't agree with you more so just excuse me to pivot just as we end here um could you kind of talk about reclaim and recover and what it is you do specifically and how uh you maybe combat family shame yeah day to day yeah yeah we address shame every day yeah that was in my tagline yeah um right so i work with families i'm a certified family recovery coach i work with families um in various stages of um loving somebody in the disease of addiction um so sometimes that's people who you know their person is in active use and they're they're trying to help them and they're trying to um just kind of get their life back and and live their life as opposed to surviving it because that's what it feels like sometimes that process can be so long i work with with families whose loved ones in early recovery working on that transitional approach and really changing the patterns that infiltrated the system when the illness kind of came into the family and how those patterns didn't don't serve any of us anymore so let's change let's change the patterns let's change our perspective let's change our mentality and communication um and then um yeah so it's it's kind of twofold working on the the family members really learning how to show up the way that they want to show up how to establish boundaries in the way that boundaries are effective and learn how to communicate with their person and release maybe some of the control that was developed over the course of the addiction and then sometimes it's also just doing some triage and kind of helping families figure out how do i get my person into treatment how do i invite them to get help how do i connect with them while they're in active use so that their journey is honored um regardless of the outcome and that's what i do awesome what i really i just want to tell you i just think the way that you think about and talk about families you work with is so filled with uh empathy and compassion um i'm confident that the work you're doing is really helping to alleviate a lot of that shame that families have to walk through uh in early recovery and it's a gift and um i i've really enjoyed working with you thank you um here at peaks so uh with that um we're going to sign off today on this episode of finding peaks um i invite you to follow us on instagram facebook spotify i don't know wherever you get your podcast apple the apple store anyway have a good one and we'll see in a week</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq-child --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- 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Episode 27: A Hopeful Recovery Journey 2021/11/01, 21:06
Episode 27: A Hopeful Recovery Journey

<p> <!-- wp:cover {"url":"https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg","id":4918,"dimRatio":0,"focalPoint":{"x":"0.52","y":"0.50"},"align":"center","className":"nvd-bg-div"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-cover aligncenter nvd-bg-div"><img class="img-responsive" class= "wp-block-cover__image-background wp-image-4918" alt="" src= "https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg" style="object-position:52% 50%" data-object-fit="cover" data-object-position="52% 50%" /> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","level":1,"textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --> <h1 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-episode-27">Episode 27</h1> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --></p> <h2 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-a-hopeful-recovery-journey">A Hopeful Recovery Journey</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cover --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"70d7264d","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/columns {"block_id":"79488721","classMigrate":true,"leftPadding":0,"rightPadding":0} --> <div class="uagb-columns__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-columns__inner-wrap uagb-columns__columns-2"> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"4a8659ae","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-4a8659ae"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-watch-now">Watch Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:embed {"url":"https://youtu.be/J2zBwFdoVx4","type":"video","providerNameSlug":"youtube","responsive":true,"className":"wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper"> https://youtu.be/J2zBwFdoVx4</div> <p><!-- /wp:embed --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"386538f5","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-386538f5"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-listen-now">Listen Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> <div class="wp-block-create-block-libsyn-podcasting-block"> <div class="libsyn-shortcode"></div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/columns --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"bdb3128d","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-27-1">Episode 27</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">One of our long-time employees opens up about her authentic recovery story in order to give hope to others who struggle with addiction.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Topics:</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:list --></p> <ul> <li>We talk as a team about how Kara became a part of our Peaks Recovery team and the growth she has seen throughout her journey.</li> <li>Kara opens up about her recovery journey and finding safety within herself through somatic experience therapy.</li> <li>Jason, our Chief Clinical Officer, talks about how it feels to see Kara come so far in her journey.</li> <li>The transition Kara has experienced becoming a strong professional within addiction treatment and helping others become their best selves.</li> <li>Kara speaks on what it’s like being a mother throughout recovery and regaining her children and herself.</li> </ul> <p><!-- /wp:list --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"1728306a","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#225b67"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","style":{"color":{"text":"#fff351"}}} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center has-text-color" id= "h-select-quotes" style="color:#fff351">Select Quotes</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/blockquote {"block_id":"8ad7b4a9","classMigrate":true,"descriptionText":"\u003cbr\u003eMy biggest superpower is the work I have done on myself, and I get to give that back to our clients. Oftentimes our clients come in, and it's really scary, and they want to focus on all these external things. And I found that when you really focus and turn inside and focus on your internal reality, all that other stuff, it comes. Your external reality will change when you focus on yourself. And because of the work I've done, that’s what I get to give away.","descColor":"#ffffff","author":"Kara Hinkle, CAS Residential Manager","authorColor":"#ffffff","enableTweet":false} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-blockquote uagb-blockquote__outer-wrap uagb-block-8ad7b4a9"> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__wrap uagb-blockquote__skin-border uagb-blockquote__stack-img-none"> <blockquote class="uagb-blockquote"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content-wrap"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content">My biggest superpower is the work I have done on myself, and I get to give that back to our clients. Oftentimes our clients come in, and it's really scary, and they want to focus on all these external things. And I found that when you really focus and turn inside and focus on your internal reality, all that other stuff, it comes. Your external reality will change when you focus on yourself. And because of the work I've done, that’s what I get to give away.</div> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__author-wrap uagb-blockquote__author-at-left"> <cite class="uagb-blockquote__author">Kara Hinkle, CAS Residential Manager</cite></div> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/blockquote --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"fa2a1abe","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"none","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-transcripts"> Episode Transcripts</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/faq {"block_id":"0d8fe77c","schema":"{\u0022@context\u0022:\u0022https://schema.org\u0022,\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022FAQPage\u0022,\u0022@id\u0022:\u0022https://peaksrecovery.com/blog/uncategorized/ep-27/\u0022,\u0022mainEntity\u0022:[{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Question\u0022,\u0022name\u0022:\u0022Episode 27 Transcript\u0022,\u0022acceptedAnswer\u0022:{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Answer\u0022,\u0022text\u0022:\u0022\u003cbr\u003ehi everybody and welcome to the finding peaks show you have it here today your host chris burns president and founder of peaks recovery centers also known as company cheerleader i was going to say burnsie i was like what's happening we have our chief clinical officer um and one of our longest standing employees jason friesman here today grateful to have you on the show wait wait wait one of who's been here longer well i know how the longest standing yeah thank you every time she's like you know i'm a long-standing employee here yeah you are you are anyway i got that wrong but we have carrot here as well um who's a residential manager with us and just a great professional as well as person in long-term recovery so really grateful to have her on here today i also wanted to mention we all have purple representative of domestic violence awareness day uh one week ago today give or take irritation we're also representing uh bullying prevention month as well as spirit day and that is a topic that is near and dear to my heart domestic violence and bullying and so i just want to stand up for those that can't stand up for themselves today and bring awareness to that because it's a very very important issue of which we see a lot of the results of that um in our behavioral health care companies so grateful to represent in a positive direction for that today grateful to have you both on the show let's get this thing going good to be here so let's do it let's go let's see here we go so we got cara on today i met kara why don't you describe the first time that we met and what that was like for you yeah so you were actually in kansas i don't know if you were marketing or what you were doing but you came on a mint trip with somebody that i actually knew um and i remember you clearly because you i remember you making a scene because everybody had their ipads and their phones and you're like what is this and that's how we met and then you told me about peaks and yeah yeah it was a really cool situation too i was at atchison valley hope and you're right i brought in our former program we had an extended care program which was a bit longer and young guys would go back home and make amends and you know bring somebody in the program that was getting ready to make amends as well and i went into that it was like the rec room at richardson valley hope and i'm sitting down and nobody's talking to me and everybody is in their phone in primary care treatment and i'm like i remember going what are you guys doing what is going on here and i'm like you care what's your name you're like i'm kara and i said what are you doing next and she said well you know i think i'm going to do the the iop the outpatient program and i said how is that different than the time before and you said it's not i've done it multiple times and i said if you want to do something different give me a call gave her my number and i was like she's never going to call mm-hmm oh i'm pretty sure my dad called you yeah yeah yeah and then you followed up too and i was like holy crap yeah your dad said hey did you talk to my daughter i was like i did that is awesome and then kara came out and was a part of serenity peaks recovery center which was our former women's program which means that i'm actually the real og i've been here from the beginning from the beginning the first group of women to go through which i think is really cool yeah absolutely are there any other women that you went through in that first round that you still communicate with yes okay yeah bobby okay bobby um molly yeah kelsey yeah not all the time but i'm still pretty close with bobby though that's awesome yeah a lot of them are still doing good that's awesome yeah i love that those connective features and that and can you talk about a little bit you know what was different you know you'd been with a couple places before peak's recovery hatches in valley hope a few times atchison valley hope i went to a place called teen challenge um you know i to be honest with you when i came to peaks i i think it was just i really felt cared about to be completely honest and i think it was also a big part was because i stayed like i had no intention of staying in colorado and you did ask me that too like okay so what's gonna be different you know i had always went home and i knew that if i had any chance to have to be sober to you know at that point i wasn't seeing my kids that i had to stay um and it was the community it was the connection yeah that's huge and it must be difficult too as a mother to say hey we i actually have to put this on hold yeah and i need to take care of myself and in my experience in the last 13 years that takes good mothers to great mothers and i got to watch you transform from a really good mother who truly cares about her kids into what i see today which is a great mother who is connecting who helps other mothers it's just a really beautiful thing to watch your recovery unfold can you talk to me a little bit about the first few times when you went to treatment what do you think it was outside of the care potentially the connection that kept you stuck um well i mean i will say i don't think i ever got into a lot of the deeper work i would go to you know valley hope which would be 30 days and that just wasn't enough time to get into that work but then i also wouldn't follow through after to whether it be iop or whatever that was individual therapy i never i could never get to that point yeah yeah which was something that i got here yeah most definitely it's kind of like that bridge it almost needs to be compassion and love to get to the other side because they have to feel safe right right and i have to feel safe with the people in front of me and can you talk about what that safety feels like in here yeah um so i mean i think it's grown over the last few years i um so when i got out of peaks i had went through something that was really hard and i was able to stay sober but i started acting out in other ways whether it be you know self-harm or just getting very angry and it was it was really hard there was a lot of grief that i hadn't worked through a lot of trauma that i hadn't worked through so i would say in 2017 2018 is whenever i started somatic experiencing which is a trauma therapy and it focuses more on your body so i was used to very much um talk therapy so i remember when i went in and i met my therapist she started you know sharing this idea with me and i was like like no i was like no like we we need we need to talk about something yeah you know because that's what i knew that's what i knew and she said okay well i want you to be open-minded to it um and so i started doing all these kooky things that didn't make any sense but what i know was that something changed because i used to um you know we carry a lot of trauma in our bodies so i mean i used to show up you know at meetings or large groups of people and i would just get i would feel so unsafe and i would just start crying and or just things like that you know or i would feel unsafe and you know i would you know i would start self-harming or whatever it be and that really helped me to calm my nervous system to calm my body down so i can then process those big emotions yeah whether it be shame or grief or loss whatever it is yeah it's almost like there's like a lock on the top of the box to get to the intensity and the key that opens it is safety yeah no i could never access it because i didn't feel safe within myself yeah once i felt safe within myself i could start connecting with those emotions and getting to the the real yeah the intimate parts of myself yeah which generally speaking we can't see clearly whatsoever until that safety is really contracted for and invested in so yeah i really love you sharing that because to watch you over the years it's just kind of been a steady pace in a recovery direction and it's not like a bat out of hell and it shouldn't be if we're doing it the right way it's sustainable day after day and it's just really cool to have watched you grown into not only in your personal life but in your professional life having been able to help hundreds of people um and be a part of a really really cool process i'm going to swing it over to here because i did the same thing a handful of weeks ago we had angela in here who actually worked with jason too and jason's been a professional in this field longer than most people at peak's recovery the 90s since the 1900s\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003esince the 1900s so i like to swing it back over to jason because he gets a lot of cool examples real time as a professional to see folks that you know he once worked with when we're in a very vulnerable position and now we're doing the same thing for others and so you know just to hear kara show up in this authentic way today i mean\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ehow does that feel for you\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eum it's it's pretty remarkable chris to be honest with you i you know having known cara now for well over six years i suppose um i think it's there were times when it seemed really dark and hopeless um even in the middle of of walking through a recovery process because um because the path wasn't clear um and i do i do sometimes talk about how um sometimes it's like wearing a headlamp you know chris you've done a lot of hiking i've done a lot of hiking with you with a headlamp on our head and sometimes you have to trust the trail and your headlamp lights up one step in front of you and that's it and i there were times for care where like the headlamp maybe lit up a half a step but that next half step you kept diligently taking it because we i couldn't see the trail ahead of you and you couldn't see the trail ahead of you um six seven years ago like it it didn't seem i don't know it just seemed very big and long and difficult and honestly um i've just got to watch and experience you taking that next step and and now it seems like the clouds departed the sun is up whatever headlamps off like the trail seems way more apparent i think uh for you and i it's it is wild to just watch and and um it is a gift of peaks i think that you know we we started this a while ago now and like um in to know you for this long i think it's just so it's just a gift to me because it doesn't happen in counseling very often either where you get to actually see somebody for this long and watch this much improvement and um to be you know closely close in this story and then be back off from the story for a while and now get to see it be full full circle and now you work with us and it's great to see you every day so yeah that was that interesting that's great yeah yeah absolutely that's what i was thinking yeah it's okay good yeah what he said yeah jason was talking i i wanna i wanna show the viewers how early in peak's recovery history cara got here so our ceo brandon burns he's our chief executive officer he does a phenomenal job running the company far better than i could for certain but i used to take him into circle groups at crestwood yeah oh yeah when serenity peaks remember yeah so i'd take him in he'd fly in from seattle you know doing his marketing job and i'd be like hey we're going to circle tonight and brandon would just sit there and circle just like what is this like he never worked in the field nor was he in uh addiction recovery most certainly and so i just i just remember that you remember having brandon yeah i do yeah yeah you would come to circle every week yeah yeah right into the house yeah for sure i love that he was able to get his start in there because that is just like and he came back yeah you know which is really cool how has it been for you as a professional helping others and growing along those lines oh yeah um yeah over the last four years i have grown professionally i have grown individually and i feel like my biggest superpower is the work i've done in myself like i get i get to give that back to our clients oftentimes right like our clients come in and it's really scary and they want to focus on all these external things you know and i found that when you really turn inside and focus on your internal reality all that other stuff it comes your external reality will change when you focus on this um and because of the work i've done i that's what i get to give away my best superhuman power is the work i've done on myself wow that's extraordinary and that's been really my experience in the last couple of years since i've really got into some sc work it's it's my greatest tool yes is the work that i'm doing and in fact i get out of set or whatever it might be and i just can't wait to share these new parts about myself and these realizations that i think can afford people in the early recovery stages some freedom and some openness and some space to explore what safety looks like for them i want to touch on something too like you have your kids back in your life today yes yeah yes yeah how's that yeah um it's amazing i so hayden my my oldest son is a little bit different but it's a door open i got to see him over the summer and i hadn't seen him for years i mean it was it was such a gift and it's still something that we're working on but it's an open door and i would have i would have never had that had i not stayed and had i not continued the work and for my son jackson having him i learned so much from my children and i really i really try to slow down to pay attention to what i can learn from my children and again because of the work i've done i get to see the messages that are received you know and it makes me become a better parent you know my son will be like well mom like maybe he'll say you know i don't want to tell you that because i was afraid like you would yell at me and i'm like oh that's it yeah that's it right there and i would never be able to know that had i not done my own work so i learned so much from my children and then my daughter dakota my two-year-old that i had in in sobriety that's just been a whole journey in itself because i got to do everything from the beginning sober you know everything being pregnant having her and that is that is a gift yeah yeah so it's been amazing yeah that's absolutely beautiful you know i i'm i'm thinking of just six eight weeks ago when we were at air city 360. and i'm hanging out with jackson and i take him up on the zip line and i can tell the way that kid looks at his mom like she's his hero and that is just such an exceptional thing to have bear witness to be a part of and be in the presence of is just like this real active and purposeful recovery and the fact that your kids actually feel safe to be like oh man you yelled at me yeah i like that that's huge tells me you're doing a lot of things right on that side yeah um jason i was i was just going to pipe in and say you know my kids are older than your guys's kids um but as you're talking i i'm reminded that um i just remember my kids would just hold up a mirror to me and particularly of me as an adult but also me as when i was their age and when they're going to kinder i can remember my kids going to kindergarten and then i would reflect on my own experience going to kindergarten and it would both expose good things and also wounds that would appear and things that i had to kind of that would emerge that i would have to work on uh for myself all along the way all you know all the way up you know to even presently like they still continue to hold that mirror up um and it's powerful because you know your story you just shared too about you your son being afraid to like share with you something hard i'm afraid i was gonna be mad at you what a gift to like have that level of honesty and we talk about all the time chris with your kids too and and what they in the honesty they can provide for you that just demonstrates such amazing trust and and that that wouldn't come if you were passing your trauma and shame on to your kids they wouldn't be able to trust that and i think that's such that's like probably the best part of this whole story actually yeah is uh the trust that that your kids can find in both of you truthfully due to the work you've done yeah i just think it's exceptional to hear a story like that because it says there's hope yeah there's a lot of hope and i have more hope today with the tools that we have at our disposal in 2021 the sc the emdr the connected client centered care trauma informed around every corner we have a real opportunity today to recover in a really meaningful way i think better than ever and so when i hear chronic relapse haven't haven't been successful i say you just haven't had the right people in front of you yeah and i think that today we have a really magical way to walk people in and out of their shame through an authentic process that is connected loving nurturing and compassionate and when i got sober in 2008 it just wasn't that way we were more of a rock bottom approach and i just love this today because it gives people to your point the opportunity to explore for themselves what safety looks like instead of me telling you what it is for you yeah which is how that old approach was but you may even got a little bit of that when we started at peak so um is there anything else you want to say to the people before we jump offline here no just thanks for having me it's an honor yeah thank you for being here and thank you for your recovery thank you for the way that you show up in this world uh as an authentic recovering human um the world would be a much better place if there was a thousand carrots in it so thank you for being here jay freeze you know what time it is thank you everybody\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ethank you everybody for tuning in again domestic violence awareness day spirit day bully prevention month all of those things are very important near and dear to our big hearts here at peaks recovery centers stay safe out there and if you ever need someone to talk to just give us a call find us on all of your podcasts instagram facebook all of that stuff out there you know what i'm talking about let's make it great\u0022}}]}"} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq uagb-faq__outer-wrap uagb-block-0d8fe77c uagb-faq-icon-row uagb-faq-layout-accordion uagb-faq-expand-first-false uagb-faq-inactive-other-true uagb-faq-equal-height" data-faqtoggle="true" role="tablist"> <div class="uagb-faq__wrap uagb-buttons-layout-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/faq-child {"block_id":"f4a82447","question":"Episode 27 Transcript","answer":"\u003cbr\u003ehi everybody and welcome to the finding peaks show you have it here today your host chris burns president and founder of peaks recovery centers also known as company cheerleader i was going to say burnsie i was like what's happening we have our chief clinical officer um and one of our longest standing employees jason friesman here today grateful to have you on the show wait wait wait one of who's been here longer well i know how the longest standing yeah thank you every time she's like you know i'm a long-standing employee here yeah you are you are anyway i got that wrong but we have carrot here as well um who's a residential manager with us and just a great professional as well as person in long-term recovery so really grateful to have her on here today i also wanted to mention we all have purple representative of domestic violence awareness day uh one week ago today give or take irritation we're also representing uh bullying prevention month as well as spirit day and that is a topic that is near and dear to my heart domestic violence and bullying and so i just want to stand up for those that can't stand up for themselves today and bring awareness to that because it's a very very important issue of which we see a lot of the results of that um in our behavioral health care companies so grateful to represent in a positive direction for that today grateful to have you both on the show let's get this thing going good to be here so let's do it let's go let's see here we go so we got cara on today i met kara why don't you describe the first time that we met and what that was like for you yeah so you were actually in kansas i don't know if you were marketing or what you were doing but you came on a mint trip with somebody that i actually knew um and i remember you clearly because you i remember you making a scene because everybody had their ipads and their phones and you're like what is this and that's how we met and then you told me about peaks and yeah yeah it was a really cool situation too i was at atchison valley hope and you're right i brought in our former program we had an extended care program which was a bit longer and young guys would go back home and make amends and you know bring somebody in the program that was getting ready to make amends as well and i went into that it was like the rec room at richardson valley hope and i'm sitting down and nobody's talking to me and everybody is in their phone in primary care treatment and i'm like i remember going what are you guys doing what is going on here and i'm like you care what's your name you're like i'm kara and i said what are you doing next and she said well you know i think i'm going to do the the iop the outpatient program and i said how is that different than the time before and you said it's not i've done it multiple times and i said if you want to do something different give me a call gave her my number and i was like she's never going to call mm-hmm oh i'm pretty sure my dad called you yeah yeah yeah and then you followed up too and i was like holy crap yeah your dad said hey did you talk to my daughter i was like i did that is awesome and then kara came out and was a part of serenity peaks recovery center which was our former women's program which means that i'm actually the real og i've been here from the beginning from the beginning the first group of women to go through which i think is really cool yeah absolutely are there any other women that you went through in that first round that you still communicate with yes okay yeah bobby okay bobby um molly yeah kelsey yeah not all the time but i'm still pretty close with bobby though that's awesome yeah a lot of them are still doing good that's awesome yeah i love that those connective features and that and can you talk about a little bit you know what was different you know you'd been with a couple places before peak's recovery hatches in valley hope a few times atchison valley hope i went to a place called teen challenge um you know i to be honest with you when i came to peaks i i think it was just i really felt cared about to be completely honest and i think it was also a big part was because i stayed like i had no intention of staying in colorado and you did ask me that too like okay so what's gonna be different you know i had always went home and i knew that if i had any chance to have to be sober to you know at that point i wasn't seeing my kids that i had to stay um and it was the community it was the connection yeah that's huge and it must be difficult too as a mother to say hey we i actually have to put this on hold yeah and i need to take care of myself and in my experience in the last 13 years that takes good mothers to great mothers and i got to watch you transform from a really good mother who truly cares about her kids into what i see today which is a great mother who is connecting who helps other mothers it's just a really beautiful thing to watch your recovery unfold can you talk to me a little bit about the first few times when you went to treatment what do you think it was outside of the care potentially the connection that kept you stuck um well i mean i will say i don't think i ever got into a lot of the deeper work i would go to you know valley hope which would be 30 days and that just wasn't enough time to get into that work but then i also wouldn't follow through after to whether it be iop or whatever that was individual therapy i never i could never get to that point yeah yeah which was something that i got here yeah most definitely it's kind of like that bridge it almost needs to be compassion and love to get to the other side because they have to feel safe right right and i have to feel safe with the people in front of me and can you talk about what that safety feels like in here yeah um so i mean i think it's grown over the last few years i um so when i got out of peaks i had went through something that was really hard and i was able to stay sober but i started acting out in other ways whether it be you know self-harm or just getting very angry and it was it was really hard there was a lot of grief that i hadn't worked through a lot of trauma that i hadn't worked through so i would say in 2017 2018 is whenever i started somatic experiencing which is a trauma therapy and it focuses more on your body so i was used to very much um talk therapy so i remember when i went in and i met my therapist she started you know sharing this idea with me and i was like like no i was like no like we we need we need to talk about something yeah you know because that's what i knew that's what i knew and she said okay well i want you to be open-minded to it um and so i started doing all these kooky things that didn't make any sense but what i know was that something changed because i used to um you know we carry a lot of trauma in our bodies so i mean i used to show up you know at meetings or large groups of people and i would just get i would feel so unsafe and i would just start crying and or just things like that you know or i would feel unsafe and you know i would you know i would start self-harming or whatever it be and that really helped me to calm my nervous system to calm my body down so i can then process those big emotions yeah whether it be shame or grief or loss whatever it is yeah it's almost like there's like a lock on the top of the box to get to the intensity and the key that opens it is safety yeah no i could never access it because i didn't feel safe within myself yeah once i felt safe within myself i could start connecting with those emotions and getting to the the real yeah the intimate parts of myself yeah which generally speaking we can't see clearly whatsoever until that safety is really contracted for and invested in so yeah i really love you sharing that because to watch you over the years it's just kind of been a steady pace in a recovery direction and it's not like a bat out of hell and it shouldn't be if we're doing it the right way it's sustainable day after day and it's just really cool to have watched you grown into not only in your personal life but in your professional life having been able to help hundreds of people um and be a part of a really really cool process i'm going to swing it over to here because i did the same thing a handful of weeks ago we had angela in here who actually worked with jason too and jason's been a professional in this field longer than most people at peak's recovery the 90s since the 1900s\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003esince the 1900s so i like to swing it back over to jason because he gets a lot of cool examples real time as a professional to see folks that you know he once worked with when we're in a very vulnerable position and now we're doing the same thing for others and so you know just to hear kara show up in this authentic way today i mean\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ehow does that feel for you\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eum it's it's pretty remarkable chris to be honest with you i you know having known cara now for well over six years i suppose um i think it's there were times when it seemed really dark and hopeless um even in the middle of of walking through a recovery process because um because the path wasn't clear um and i do i do sometimes talk about how um sometimes it's like wearing a headlamp you know chris you've done a lot of hiking i've done a lot of hiking with you with a headlamp on our head and sometimes you have to trust the trail and your headlamp lights up one step in front of you and that's it and i there were times for care where like the headlamp maybe lit up a half a step but that next half step you kept diligently taking it because we i couldn't see the trail ahead of you and you couldn't see the trail ahead of you um six seven years ago like it it didn't seem i don't know it just seemed very big and long and difficult and honestly um i've just got to watch and experience you taking that next step and and now it seems like the clouds departed the sun is up whatever headlamps off like the trail seems way more apparent i think uh for you and i it's it is wild to just watch and and um it is a gift of peaks i think that you know we we started this a while ago now and like um in to know you for this long i think it's just so it's just a gift to me because it doesn't happen in counseling very often either where you get to actually see somebody for this long and watch this much improvement and um to be you know closely close in this story and then be back off from the story for a while and now get to see it be full full circle and now you work with us and it's great to see you every day so yeah that was that interesting that's great yeah yeah absolutely that's what i was thinking yeah it's okay good yeah what he said yeah jason was talking i i wanna i wanna show the viewers how early in peak's recovery history cara got here so our ceo brandon burns he's our chief executive officer he does a phenomenal job running the company far better than i could for certain but i used to take him into circle groups at crestwood yeah oh yeah when serenity peaks remember yeah so i'd take him in he'd fly in from seattle you know doing his marketing job and i'd be like hey we're going to circle tonight and brandon would just sit there and circle just like what is this like he never worked in the field nor was he in uh addiction recovery most certainly and so i just i just remember that you remember having brandon yeah i do yeah yeah you would come to circle every week yeah yeah right into the house yeah for sure i love that he was able to get his start in there because that is just like and he came back yeah you know which is really cool how has it been for you as a professional helping others and growing along those lines oh yeah um yeah over the last four years i have grown professionally i have grown individually and i feel like my biggest superpower is the work i've done in myself like i get i get to give that back to our clients oftentimes right like our clients come in and it's really scary and they want to focus on all these external things you know and i found that when you really turn inside and focus on your internal reality all that other stuff it comes your external reality will change when you focus on this um and because of the work i've done i that's what i get to give away my best superhuman power is the work i've done on myself wow that's extraordinary and that's been really my experience in the last couple of years since i've really got into some sc work it's it's my greatest tool yes is the work that i'm doing and in fact i get out of set or whatever it might be and i just can't wait to share these new parts about myself and these realizations that i think can afford people in the early recovery stages some freedom and some openness and some space to explore what safety looks like for them i want to touch on something too like you have your kids back in your life today yes yeah yes yeah how's that yeah um it's amazing i so hayden my my oldest son is a little bit different but it's a door open i got to see him over the summer and i hadn't seen him for years i mean it was it was such a gift and it's still something that we're working on but it's an open door and i would have i would have never had that had i not stayed and had i not continued the work and for my son jackson having him i learned so much from my children and i really i really try to slow down to pay attention to what i can learn from my children and again because of the work i've done i get to see the messages that are received you know and it makes me become a better parent you know my son will be like well mom like maybe he'll say you know i don't want to tell you that because i was afraid like you would yell at me and i'm like oh that's it yeah that's it right there and i would never be able to know that had i not done my own work so i learned so much from my children and then my daughter dakota my two-year-old that i had in in sobriety that's just been a whole journey in itself because i got to do everything from the beginning sober you know everything being pregnant having her and that is that is a gift yeah yeah so it's been amazing yeah that's absolutely beautiful you know i i'm i'm thinking of just six eight weeks ago when we were at air city 360. and i'm hanging out with jackson and i take him up on the zip line and i can tell the way that kid looks at his mom like she's his hero and that is just such an exceptional thing to have bear witness to be a part of and be in the presence of is just like this real active and purposeful recovery and the fact that your kids actually feel safe to be like oh man you yelled at me yeah i like that that's huge tells me you're doing a lot of things right on that side yeah um jason i was i was just going to pipe in and say you know my kids are older than your guys's kids um but as you're talking i i'm reminded that um i just remember my kids would just hold up a mirror to me and particularly of me as an adult but also me as when i was their age and when they're going to kinder i can remember my kids going to kindergarten and then i would reflect on my own experience going to kindergarten and it would both expose good things and also wounds that would appear and things that i had to kind of that would emerge that i would have to work on uh for myself all along the way all you know all the way up you know to even presently like they still continue to hold that mirror up um and it's powerful because you know your story you just shared too about you your son being afraid to like share with you something hard i'm afraid i was gonna be mad at you what a gift to like have that level of honesty and we talk about all the time chris with your kids too and and what they in the honesty they can provide for you that just demonstrates such amazing trust and and that that wouldn't come if you were passing your trauma and shame on to your kids they wouldn't be able to trust that and i think that's such that's like probably the best part of this whole story actually yeah is uh the trust that that your kids can find in both of you truthfully due to the work you've done yeah i just think it's exceptional to hear a story like that because it says there's hope yeah there's a lot of hope and i have more hope today with the tools that we have at our disposal in 2021 the sc the emdr the connected client centered care trauma informed around every corner we have a real opportunity today to recover in a really meaningful way i think better than ever and so when i hear chronic relapse haven't haven't been successful i say you just haven't had the right people in front of you yeah and i think that today we have a really magical way to walk people in and out of their shame through an authentic process that is connected loving nurturing and compassionate and when i got sober in 2008 it just wasn't that way we were more of a rock bottom approach and i just love this today because it gives people to your point the opportunity to explore for themselves what safety looks like instead of me telling you what it is for you yeah which is how that old approach was but you may even got a little bit of that when we started at peak so um is there anything else you want to say to the people before we jump offline here no just thanks for having me it's an honor yeah thank you for being here and thank you for your recovery thank you for the way that you show up in this world uh as an authentic recovering human um the world would be a much better place if there was a thousand carrots in it so thank you for being here jay freeze you know what time it is thank you everybody\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ethank you everybody for tuning in again domestic violence awareness day spirit day bully prevention month all of those things are very important near and dear to our big hearts here at peaks recovery centers stay safe out there and if you ever need someone to talk to just give us a call find us on all of your podcasts instagram facebook all of that stuff out there you know what i'm talking about let's make it great"} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq-child uagb-faq-child__outer-wrap uagb-block-f4a82447"> <div class="uagb-faq-child__wrapper"> <div class="uagb-faq-item" role="tab"> <div class="uagb-faq-questions-button uagb-faq-questions"> <span class="uagb-question">Episode 27 Transcript</span></div> <div class="uagb-faq-content"><span><br /> <br /></span> <p><span>hi everybody and welcome to the finding peaks show you have it here today your host chris burns president and founder of peaks recovery centers also known as company cheerleader i was going to say burnsie i was like what's happening we have our chief clinical officer um and one of our longest standing employees jason friesman here today grateful to have you on the show wait wait wait one of who's been here longer well i know how the longest standing yeah thank you every time she's like you know i'm a long-standing employee here yeah you are you are anyway i got that wrong but we have carrot here as well um who's a residential manager with us and just a great professional as well as person in long-term recovery so really grateful to have her on here today i also wanted to mention we all have purple representative of domestic violence awareness day uh one week ago today give or take irritation we're also representing uh bullying prevention month as well as spirit day and that is a topic that is near and dear to my heart domestic violence and bullying and so i just want to stand up for those that can't stand up for themselves today and bring awareness to that because it's a very very important issue of which we see a lot of the results of that um in our behavioral health care companies so grateful to represent in a positive direction for that today grateful to have you both on the show let's get this thing going good to be here so let's do it let's go let's see here we go so we got cara on today i met kara why don't you describe the first time that we met and what that was like for you yeah so you were actually in kansas i don't know if you were marketing or what you were doing but you came on a mint trip with somebody that i actually knew um and i remember you clearly because you i remember you making a scene because everybody had their ipads and their phones and you're like what is this and that's how we met and then you told me about peaks and yeah yeah it was a really cool situation too i was at atchison valley hope and you're right i brought in our former program we had an extended care program which was a bit longer and young guys would go back home and make amends and you know bring somebody in the program that was getting ready to make amends as well and i went into that it was like the rec room at richardson valley hope and i'm sitting down and nobody's talking to me and everybody is in their phone in primary care treatment and i'm like i remember going what are you guys doing what is going on here and i'm like you care what's your name you're like i'm kara and i said what are you doing next and she said well you know i think i'm going to do the the iop the outpatient program and i said how is that different than the time before and you said it's not i've done it multiple times and i said if you want to do something different give me a call gave her my number and i was like she's never going to call mm-hmm oh i'm pretty sure my dad called you yeah yeah yeah and then you followed up too and i was like holy crap yeah your dad said hey did you talk to my daughter i was like i did that is awesome and then kara came out and was a part of serenity peaks recovery center which was our former women's program which means that i'm actually the real og i've been here from the beginning from the beginning the first group of women to go through which i think is really cool yeah absolutely are there any other women that you went through in that first round that you still communicate with yes okay yeah bobby okay bobby um molly yeah kelsey yeah not all the time but i'm still pretty close with bobby though that's awesome yeah a lot of them are still doing good that's awesome yeah i love that those connective features and that and can you talk about a little bit you know what was different you know you'd been with a couple places before peak's recovery hatches in valley hope a few times atchison valley hope i went to a place called teen challenge um you know i to be honest with you when i came to peaks i i think it was just i really felt cared about to be completely honest and i think it was also a big part was because i stayed like i had no intention of staying in colorado and you did ask me that too like okay so what's gonna be different you know i had always went home and i knew that if i had any chance to have to be sober to you know at that point i wasn't seeing my kids that i had to stay um and it was the community it was the connection yeah that's huge and it must be difficult too as a mother to say hey we i actually have to put this on hold yeah and i need to take care of myself and in my experience in the last 13 years that takes good mothers to great mothers and i got to watch you transform from a really good mother who truly cares about her kids into what i see today which is a great mother who is connecting who helps other mothers it's just a really beautiful thing to watch your recovery unfold can you talk to me a little bit about the first few times when you went to treatment what do you think it was outside of the care potentially the connection that kept you stuck um well i mean i will say i don't think i ever got into a lot of the deeper work i would go to you know valley hope which would be 30 days and that just wasn't enough time to get into that work but then i also wouldn't follow through after to whether it be iop or whatever that was individual therapy i never i could never get to that point yeah yeah which was something that i got here yeah most definitely it's kind of like that bridge it almost needs to be compassion and love to get to the other side because they have to feel safe right right and i have to feel safe with the people in front of me and can you talk about what that safety feels like in here yeah um so i mean i think it's grown over the last few years i um so when i got out of peaks i had went through something that was really hard and i was able to stay sober but i started acting out in other ways whether it be you know self-harm or just getting very angry and it was it was really hard there was a lot of grief that i hadn't worked through a lot of trauma that i hadn't worked through so i would say in 2017 2018 is whenever i started somatic experiencing which is a trauma therapy and it focuses more on your body so i was used to very much um talk therapy so i remember when i went in and i met my therapist she started you know sharing this idea with me and i was like like no i was like no like we we need we need to talk about something yeah you know because that's what i knew that's what i knew and she said okay well i want you to be open-minded to it um and so i started doing all these kooky things that didn't make any sense but what i know was that something changed because i used to um you know we carry a lot of trauma in our bodies so i mean i used to show up you know at meetings or large groups of people and i would just get i would feel so unsafe and i would just start crying and or just things like that you know or i would feel unsafe and you know i would you know i would start self-harming or whatever it be and that really helped me to calm my nervous system to calm my body down so i can then process those big emotions yeah whether it be shame or grief or loss whatever it is yeah it's almost like there's like a lock on the top of the box to get to the intensity and the key that opens it is safety yeah no i could never access it because i didn't feel safe within myself yeah once i felt safe within myself i could start connecting with those emotions and getting to the the real yeah the intimate parts of myself yeah which generally speaking we can't see clearly whatsoever until that safety is really contracted for and invested in so yeah i really love you sharing that because to watch you over the years it's just kind of been a steady pace in a recovery direction and it's not like a bat out of hell and it shouldn't be if we're doing it the right way it's sustainable day after day and it's just really cool to have watched you grown into not only in your personal life but in your professional life having been able to help hundreds of people um and be a part of a really really cool process i'm going to swing it over to here because i did the same thing a handful of weeks ago we had angela in here who actually worked with jason too and jason's been a professional in this field longer than most people at peak's recovery the 90s since the 1900s</span></p> <p><span>since the 1900s so i like to swing it back over to jason because he gets a lot of cool examples real time as a professional to see folks that you know he once worked with when we're in a very vulnerable position and now we're doing the same thing for others and so you know just to hear kara show up in this authentic way today i mean</span></p> <p><span>how does that feel for you</span></p> <p><span>um it's it's pretty remarkable chris to be honest with you i you know having known cara now for well over six years i suppose um i think it's there were times when it seemed really dark and hopeless um even in the middle of of walking through a recovery process because um because the path wasn't clear um and i do i do sometimes talk about how um sometimes it's like wearing a headlamp you know chris you've done a lot of hiking i've done a lot of hiking with you with a headlamp on our head and sometimes you have to trust the trail and your headlamp lights up one step in front of you and that's it and i there were times for care where like the headlamp maybe lit up a half a step but that next half step you kept diligently taking it because we i couldn't see the trail ahead of you and you couldn't see the trail ahead of you um six seven years ago like it it didn't seem i don't know it just seemed very big and long and difficult and honestly um i've just got to watch and experience you taking that next step and and now it seems like the clouds departed the sun is up whatever headlamps off like the trail seems way more apparent i think uh for you and i it's it is wild to just watch and and um it is a gift of peaks i think that you know we we started this a while ago now and like um in to know you for this long i think it's just so it's just a gift to me because it doesn't happen in counseling very often either where you get to actually see somebody for this long and watch this much improvement and um to be you know closely close in this story and then be back off from the story for a while and now get to see it be full full circle and now you work with us and it's great to see you every day so yeah that was that interesting that's great yeah yeah absolutely that's what i was thinking yeah it's okay good yeah what he said yeah jason was talking i i wanna i wanna show the viewers how early in peak's recovery history cara got here so our ceo brandon burns he's our chief executive officer he does a phenomenal job running the company far better than i could for certain but i used to take him into circle groups at crestwood yeah oh yeah when serenity peaks remember yeah so i'd take him in he'd fly in from seattle you know doing his marketing job and i'd be like hey we're going to circle tonight and brandon would just sit there and circle just like what is this like he never worked in the field nor was he in uh addiction recovery most certainly and so i just i just remember that you remember having brandon yeah i do yeah yeah you would come to circle every week yeah yeah right into the house yeah for sure i love that he was able to get his start in there because that is just like and he came back yeah you know which is really cool how has it been for you as a professional helping others and growing along those lines oh yeah um yeah over the last four years i have grown professionally i have grown individually and i feel like my biggest superpower is the work i've done in myself like i get i get to give that back to our clients oftentimes right like our clients come in and it's really scary and they want to focus on all these external things you know and i found that when you really turn inside and focus on your internal reality all that other stuff it comes your external reality will change when you focus on this um and because of the work i've done i that's what i get to give away my best superhuman power is the work i've done on myself wow that's extraordinary and that's been really my experience in the last couple of years since i've really got into some sc work it's it's my greatest tool yes is the work that i'm doing and in fact i get out of set or whatever it might be and i just can't wait to share these new parts about myself and these realizations that i think can afford people in the early recovery stages some freedom and some openness and some space to explore what safety looks like for them i want to touch on something too like you have your kids back in your life today yes yeah yes yeah how's that yeah um it's amazing i so hayden my my oldest son is a little bit different but it's a door open i got to see him over the summer and i hadn't seen him for years i mean it was it was such a gift and it's still something that we're working on but it's an open door and i would have i would have never had that had i not stayed and had i not continued the work and for my son jackson having him i learned so much from my children and i really i really try to slow down to pay attention to what i can learn from my children and again because of the work i've done i get to see the messages that are received you know and it makes me become a better parent you know my son will be like well mom like maybe he'll say you know i don't want to tell you that because i was afraid like you would yell at me and i'm like oh that's it yeah that's it right there and i would never be able to know that had i not done my own work so i learned so much from my children and then my daughter dakota my two-year-old that i had in in sobriety that's just been a whole journey in itself because i got to do everything from the beginning sober you know everything being pregnant having her and that is that is a gift yeah yeah so it's been amazing yeah that's absolutely beautiful you know i i'm i'm thinking of just six eight weeks ago when we were at air city 360. and i'm hanging out with jackson and i take him up on the zip line and i can tell the way that kid looks at his mom like she's his hero and that is just such an exceptional thing to have bear witness to be a part of and be in the presence of is just like this real active and purposeful recovery and the fact that your kids actually feel safe to be like oh man you yelled at me yeah i like that that's huge tells me you're doing a lot of things right on that side yeah um jason i was i was just going to pipe in and say you know my kids are older than your guys's kids um but as you're talking i i'm reminded that um i just remember my kids would just hold up a mirror to me and particularly of me as an adult but also me as when i was their age and when they're going to kinder i can remember my kids going to kindergarten and then i would reflect on my own experience going to kindergarten and it would both expose good things and also wounds that would appear and things that i had to kind of that would emerge that i would have to work on uh for myself all along the way all you know all the way up you know to even presently like they still continue to hold that mirror up um and it's powerful because you know your story you just shared too about you your son being afraid to like share with you something hard i'm afraid i was gonna be mad at you what a gift to like have that level of honesty and we talk about all the time chris with your kids too and and what they in the honesty they can provide for you that just demonstrates such amazing trust and and that that wouldn't come if you were passing your trauma and shame on to your kids they wouldn't be able to trust that and i think that's such that's like probably the best part of this whole story actually yeah is uh the trust that that your kids can find in both of you truthfully due to the work you've done yeah i just think it's exceptional to hear a story like that because it says there's hope yeah there's a lot of hope and i have more hope today with the tools that we have at our disposal in 2021 the sc the emdr the connected client centered care trauma informed around every corner we have a real opportunity today to recover in a really meaningful way i think better than ever and so when i hear chronic relapse haven't haven't been successful i say you just haven't had the right people in front of you yeah and i think that today we have a really magical way to walk people in and out of their shame through an authentic process that is connected loving nurturing and compassionate and when i got sober in 2008 it just wasn't that way we were more of a rock bottom approach and i just love this today because it gives people to your point the opportunity to explore for themselves what safety looks like instead of me telling you what it is for you yeah which is how that old approach was but you may even got a little bit of that when we started at peak so um is there anything else you want to say to the people before we jump offline here no just thanks for having me it's an honor yeah thank you for being here and thank you for your recovery thank you for the way that you show up in this world uh as an authentic recovering human um the world would be a much better place if there was a thousand carrots in it so thank you for being here jay freeze you know what time it is thank you everybody</span></p> <p><span>thank you everybody for tuning in again domestic violence awareness day spirit day bully prevention month all of those things are very important near and dear to our big hearts here at peaks recovery centers stay safe out there and if you ever need someone to talk to just give us a call find us on all of your podcasts instagram facebook all of that stuff out there you know what i'm talking about let's make it great</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq-child --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p><!-- wp:block {"ref":1510} /--></p>

Episode 21: A Remarkable Recovery Story 2021/09/20, 21:33
Episode 21: A Remarkable Recovery Story

<p> <!-- wp:cover {"url":"https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg","id":4918,"dimRatio":0,"focalPoint":{"x":"0.52","y":"0.50"},"align":"center","className":"nvd-bg-div"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-cover aligncenter nvd-bg-div"><img class="img-responsive" class= "wp-block-cover__image-background wp-image-4918" alt="" src= "https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg" style="object-position:52% 50%" data-object-fit="cover" data-object-position="52% 50%" /> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","level":1,"textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --> <h1 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-episode-21">Episode 21</h1> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --></p> <h2 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-a-remarkable-recovery-story">A Remarkable Recovery Story</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cover --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"4e920d15","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/columns {"block_id":"b9286bd6","classMigrate":true,"leftPadding":0,"rightPadding":0} --> <div class="uagb-columns__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-columns__inner-wrap uagb-columns__columns-2"> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"11b7c2f0","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-11b7c2f0"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-watch-now">Watch Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:embed {"url":"https://youtu.be/k5U5lF1lha4","type":"video","providerNameSlug":"youtube","responsive":true,"className":"wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper"> https://youtu.be/k5U5lF1lha4</div> <p><!-- /wp:embed --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"9f567c81","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-9f567c81"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-listen-now">Listen Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> <div class="wp-block-create-block-libsyn-podcasting-block"> <div class="libsyn-shortcode"></div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/columns --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"8a07f237","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-21-1">Episode 21</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">A very special guest, and long-time employee of Peaks, bravely shares her inspiring recovery story in order to give hope to others who struggle with addiction.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Topics:</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph --></p> <p>Jason talks about his early clinician days, all while meeting Angela during those days, who was in her early days of recovery.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph --></p> <p>Angela talks a little about what her mindset was back before she started her recovery journey, and the hardships she walked through.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph --></p> <p>Angela talks about what her life looks like now as an admissions specialist, helping families through getting their loved one into treatment.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"31b33f0b","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#225b67"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","style":{"color":{"text":"#fff351"}}} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center has-text-color" id= "h-select-quotes" style="color:#fff351">Select Quotes</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/blockquote {"block_id":"40063c79","classMigrate":true,"descriptionText":"What I have learned in my recovery is that the most important thing to me is leading with my heart. I want to help people, I want to care about people, I know what it is like to be at the bottom. What I remember from people who tried to help me was that care. For me I just wanted to be in any kind of avenue in the treatment industry.","descColor":"#ffffff","author":"Angela Lopez, Admissions Specialist","authorColor":"#ffffff","enableTweet":false} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-blockquote uagb-blockquote__outer-wrap uagb-block-40063c79"> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__wrap uagb-blockquote__skin-border uagb-blockquote__stack-img-none"> <blockquote class="uagb-blockquote"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content-wrap"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content">What I have learned in my recovery is that the most important thing to me is leading with my heart. I want to help people, I want to care about people, I know what it is like to be at the bottom. What I remember from people who tried to help me was that care. For me I just wanted to be in any kind of avenue in the treatment industry.</div> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__author-wrap uagb-blockquote__author-at-left"> <cite class="uagb-blockquote__author">Angela Lopez, Admissions Specialist</cite></div> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/blockquote --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"0ac2d9db","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"none","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-transcripts"> Episode Transcripts</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/faq {"block_id":"715eee1b","schema":"{\u0022@context\u0022:\u0022https://schema.org\u0022,\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022FAQPage\u0022,\u0022@id\u0022:\u0022https://peaksrecovery.com/blog/episodes/ep-21/\u0022,\u0022mainEntity\u0022:[{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Question\u0022,\u0022name\u0022:\u0022Episode 21 Transcript\u0022,\u0022acceptedAnswer\u0022:{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Answer\u0022,\u0022text\u0022:\u0022\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003egood afternoon everybody and welcome to the finding peaks recovery show i have two great friends here angela lopez who's a personal friend of mine and also a professional that works with peaks recovery and then my man mr j freeze happy to be here today happy to have this group together really excited about the topic of conversation today which is we're just gonna open it up with big hearts big smiles and kick it over to my man jay but what i'm gonna say really quickly is these two have had a relationship um a clinical relationship before they had a personal relationship and so we just kind of wanted to start today's video talking about some of those early stages of angela's recovery or even before she um ended up getting sober this time in some of his early stages as a new clinician coming out of school and working with someone like angela so we're just going to get this thing going um and talk with jason first and just what was that experience like or what is the experience like to see a professional a person in recovery with integrity who has helped a tremendous amount of people not only get well get clean to be a connector in the community seeing where you saw her initially and then getting to see her now what is what is that like for you\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eand great question chris i think you know we were talking before the show started as we do and i was really reflecting on the day angela tracked me down which was what five years five years ago probably four and a half or five years ago um and i had known her like you said from even many years before that when i had less gray hair and i had more hair i apparently dressed terribly but um\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ebut i do think uh that day um it was i remember i was downstairs at our center um in our women's program that at the time and um angela tracked me down and i hadn't talked to you i don't know how long what like 10 years maybe 10 years probably um but you'd really made a huge impression on me and so when you looked me up um i was eager to see you and um and honestly it's one of the most rewarding things of being a counselor at times is when people kind of track me down down the road and are like uh i'm doing well on my journey even if you know even if it didn't have its stumbles along the way um but i just remember you walked in and um you're this beautiful little girl that could barely walk and um and i i obviously knew right away you were doing well because your presence and and who you were um and i remember even on that day angela like i was hoping that one day you would work with us and were you working at a different program at the time i can't remember i wasn't quite yet but soon after you and i met then i started working in treatment at a different program yeah at an entry level technician job but i think through my experience with you um but also feeling um that you cared for me back then and you never pushed me away or said you're doing this wrong you just met me where i was and i think that that along with other people in my recovery journey made the most impact that oh i know how to care for people and i think that that's kind of what sparked my interest in wanting to work in treatment that um if there's anything i knew how to do it was care about somebody yet how like i mean share how we met like do you want to talk about that so we met when i was i believe i was 17 years old 17 or 16. and at the time it was very early on in my addiction so i'd only been using for maybe a year or two at the time um i also struggled with eating disorders i had terrible relationships with men so i was just kind of all over the map i wouldn't listen to my parents my mom lived out here in colorado my dad lived in vegas and so i definitely used that dynamic to my advantage to get what i wanted and which really put me in a position of not being able to accept help because there was a way out so my mom contacted you and i started seeing jason individually who do i talk to you okay talk to me yeah um i started seeing you individually yeah and i think at the time i was nowhere near ready even admitting that i had any kind of problem um i was in a relationship that was unhealthy at the time uh him and i were using together and so again i had a way out from looking at my problems so you tried your best um and you're good i gave\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eyeah you know and i had wonderful family support i just wasn't willing to look at my own problems so you know your recommendation time after time was you need to go in inpatient yeah and i was just not having it i think i even remember you bringing my parents into our session and sitting us all down and saying this is what's happening and as soon as i saw everybody i was out i left the office i was like nope not doing this yeah i left and um yeah that's that's how we first met and then i think from there we lost contact i went back to vegas and that's really where um you know i really dove deep into my addiction from there that makes sense yeah and i love that too because we're talking trauma informed before it was cool right there and that's that's what i saw there is and i think you know there was a tremendous amount of intensity in the field 10 years ago to say let's lock her away and throw away the key and let's tell her the decision she's making is wrong and let's draw a hard line in the sand and let's make sure she loses everything just to get her into treatment but what you did and what she spoke to was you just let her know that she has a seat here no matter what and whenever you're ready i'm gonna be here and i just i tend to believe it's through a lot of interactions like that that recoveries are built and it becomes safe so i just wanted to say that it's just it was trauma informed before it was cool yeah yeah and i think that that was impactful to me because at the time i didn't really have anything um i didn't really care about anything in my life that i was scared of losing so i was comfortable having nothing and i think that the part that was hard for me was letting somebody care for me because had i let that happen there's endless amount of people that would have i i just couldn't see that in myself that i was deserving of that yet um so i think that that maybe um is why i remembered you even years and years later was that feeling that like oh he cared for me when i didn't even give a [ __ ] about myself yeah yeah and planning that a little teary if you keep talking like that it's really powerful um\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eand it is it is weird to me because like i i do remember it like it was last week like when you were over there and and uh and then we'll talk about kind of then how did you how did you get sober you don't i know we've talked you probably talked about that in here a little bit before but like how did you get sober and then i i do want to ask some other questions about now then too sure so what happened from there i went back to vegas and my life just took a dive i was in a relationship um that was very unhealthy so between you know the codependent dynamic that we had i'm not sure what came first really my addiction to him or the addiction to drugs and so eventually i found heroin and um i had tried to get sober i you know a couple years in i was like all right i give i i have enough like let's try this and you know i attempted sobriety it didn't stick i attempted again i went to treatment didn't stick it in the same time i was dealing with an eating disorder so you know if it wasn't one it was the other and at the time i just felt like there's really no hope for me so you know i tried um and then when i was 19 years old my ex-boyfriend he he passed away from from an overdose and i think that that's what made me um realize that i wasn't invincible and also made me feel like i had nothing left to live for so you know i started doing speed balls after that and i went to california for a while to try to get sober but ended up down on skid row because that's where i could find drugs i mean so you know i was using down there and a bunch of places in between you know to i went to memphis tennessee i went to out here in colorado to try to get sober to california and i just tried to get away from essentially myself and it wasn't sticking so the last time i went to treatment my story is that i went to treatment 10 times before i finally got sober and that's definitely not everybody's experience and i never hope for anybody to go through that but for me that's what it took and i and i'm grateful for that but number 10 i went to treatment and i week in i was like okay i'm gonna use and once it was in my mind i was like okay this is what i'm doing and so i left a weekend and i used and it was the worst 24 hours of my life um i didn't use any of the substances that i had convinced myself i was addicted to uh you know up until then i blamed it on the drugs i was using or you know if you tried heroin then you would be addicted too and in that 24 hours i didn't use anything i was addicted to and i could not stop so i was convinced at that time that okay this is me that's the problem you know it's not the driving it's not my family it's not my parents it's me and i called the treatment center and i asked them if i could come back and i think that that was the first moment that i ever trusted anything bigger than myself and i ever showed a bit of humility and i asked to come back and they let me and that made the biggest difference all the other programs i had gotten kicked out of or when i relapsed they said you weren't welcome back and so when they welcomed me back um i went back but not only did they let me come back they were grateful that i was alive and they were grateful that i was not giving up on myself and from then i just decided to take suggestions and you know everything didn't happen at once i didn't become a healthy normal individual as soon as i stopped using drugs i had trauma to work through i had depression anxiety wow i had no idea that you run skid row so i go every every well the last two years um and when i go and visit places inner cities urban areas i like to run from where i'm at today where i've been and always to come back to where i want to be and it's a really spiritual thing and so i'll do these runs through skid row and you know i just i miss all of that when i meet you because i meet the professional and i meet the person sitting in our lobby who is convicted to be the best mother on earth and will do anything for her child and her recovery and that's how i came to know angela was this great integris woman in recovery great mother great values\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ebig hearts and so to hear a story like that it kind of makes me sad because you're right you are worth so much more than that but oftentimes our stories our pain our shame whatever it is lead us to a place where we're isolated and all alone and disconnected but it is just so rewarding to see your recovery intention today in the way that you live your life which is attractive to each and every person you have the opportunity to come into contact with i mean it is truly something that people want more in their lives today is your resolve and your energy and your compassion and your love so much so that i didn't mention it on the front end but angela started out as what we call now a cca client care aid and i think it was probably a house manager back then and she was a graveyard overnight manager and she took a weekend yeah that's where i started just her best shift the best shift ever she took a three dollar pay cut and came to peak's recovery um tell me about that experience of taking that pay cut why did you do it how'd you do it yeah so i was working at another program and you know initially\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ewhat i've learned i guess in my recovery is that the most important thing to me is leading with my heart and you know i just want to help people i want to care about people i know what it's like to be at the bottom and what i remember from people that tried to help me is that um that care so for me i just wanted to be in any kind of avenue in the treatment you know industry so i started off as a technician with a corporate program so i was making a little bit more but eventually i didn't feel any heart i didn't feel useful um i felt like i just handed out cigarettes and that was it so i was like okay this is just not for me and it was like okay this is three dollars more but at what cost and the cost was at me not feeling useful and really feeling drained by helping people and that's never my hope so you know i knew of peace because of jason and i when i had come to see him so i was like you know what i believe in that program and um i printed off my resume and i walked into the office and um rachel tap she interviewed me in that moment and you know the only shift they had available was overnight on the weekends to me that was small compared to the three dollars and the pay cut because it was something that was meaningful to me so what my wife looked like at the time i was a single mom already of my daughter who was one and a half so there's no daycare on the weekends so i would work 12 hours overnight and then i would pick her up from pueblo where my sister lived drive back try to take a nap while my one and a half year old is tearing up the house and then drop her off and go back to work for 12 hours and then monday morning then she would be able to go to school and i would be able to sleep and so that that's what my life looked like and then you know from there i think um what made the biggest difference for me professionally is just acting out of integrity and putting my heart first even in what i do um as a job so i think from there i was able to work my way up through the company yeah it's a really beautiful thing and then i think we do mean to actually lose you back to the almost almost and then we're like no no we'll just let's just pay her that three bucks she's worth all of it and now angela is an admission specialist she brings people in on the front end of treatment and if my sons god forbid would ever have to go to treatment i can't think of somebody that i would want them to get on the phone with other than you because you're going to lead with that heart you're going to make them feel safe you're going to tell them that they're valuable even when they don't believe it and that's the type of people that i want in and around my recovery circle in and around our treatment program and in our communities and can you talk a little bit about what that admissions job has kind of changed for you professionally what is it like to really have those families on the front end a lot of times very vulnerable i mean the work that you do is so precious and has to be so precise and the family often times is like clay yeah and sometimes people do poorly with that clay yeah and i think you do just a magnificent job um filled with integrity and so what what has that been like for you transitioning from like client-centered to more centered yeah so i think for me what i remind the families that i am working with is that we all have the same goal nobody wants to live their life you know doing drugs and living in this burden of mental health and so nobody wants to be there and there's no right way to get to recovery i think that a lot of the tension between families comes because one person thinks there's a right way and typically the client is like no that's not the right way to support me which is there's probably truth in that somewhere so i think that that's the biggest thing i remember is that okay we all have the same goal here and how do we get there and then also making them um you know feel like they're not alone in this um i think even if i don't tell them specifically i want them to feel that that you know there's they've been hurting their loved one has been hurting and there's a solution for that and so i think that that's just always my hope is every time i take the call is that okay make them feel like they are not alone and i think that that makes the world of difference um is for somebody to feel like they have somebody to support them yeah and then that you can relate to and i love the way that you can relate with families and people and even if it's not necessarily your story you do a really cool job of allowing them to see their story in yours and i think that's a really cool unique professional and personal trait that you have is really highlighting a story that might be a bit different but enabling that story or enabling them to see their story in that so that relatability and that safety right away i just think you do such a phenomenal job with that because when you were telling your story i never was on skid row but damn i felt like i connected with that you know really really well and so i just really appreciate you coming on here today and really just talking about some of those things that are near and dear to your heart in your recovery process that is so intimate to you and your family and i've just really got a tremendous amount of gratitude for who you are what you're about and what you do on a daily basis and i couldn't celebrate you more both personally professionally and you're amazing mother an amazing professional amazing person and that bright light just exudes off of you so thank you so much for coming in today jason as always chief clinical officer admission specialist cheerleader\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eit's been it's been awesome opportunity having you all on today um i appreciate you coming on and spending some time on this sorry about the technical difficulties that's what people with big hearts do they don't pay attention to wires sometimes it goes a loop thank you so much please find us on spotify facebook instagram wherever you get your podcast we love you big hearts big smiles peaks recovery let's go\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u0022}}]}"} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq uagb-faq__outer-wrap uagb-block-715eee1b uagb-faq-icon-row uagb-faq-layout-accordion uagb-faq-expand-first-false uagb-faq-inactive-other-true uagb-faq-equal-height" data-faqtoggle="true" role="tablist"> <div class="uagb-faq__wrap uagb-buttons-layout-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/faq-child {"block_id":"4f330be1","question":"Episode 21 Transcript","answer":"\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003egood afternoon everybody and welcome to the finding peaks recovery show i have two great friends here angela lopez who's a personal friend of mine and also a professional that works with peaks recovery and then my man mr j freeze happy to be here today happy to have this group together really excited about the topic of conversation today which is we're just gonna open it up with big hearts big smiles and kick it over to my man jay but what i'm gonna say really quickly is these two have had a relationship um a clinical relationship before they had a personal relationship and so we just kind of wanted to start today's video talking about some of those early stages of angela's recovery or even before she um ended up getting sober this time in some of his early stages as a new clinician coming out of school and working with someone like angela so we're just going to get this thing going um and talk with jason first and just what was that experience like or what is the experience like to see a professional a person in recovery with integrity who has helped a tremendous amount of people not only get well get clean to be a connector in the community seeing where you saw her initially and then getting to see her now what is what is that like for you\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eand great question chris i think you know we were talking before the show started as we do and i was really reflecting on the day angela tracked me down which was what five years five years ago probably four and a half or five years ago um and i had known her like you said from even many years before that when i had less gray hair and i had more hair i apparently dressed terribly but um\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ebut i do think uh that day um it was i remember i was downstairs at our center um in our women's program that at the time and um angela tracked me down and i hadn't talked to you i don't know how long what like 10 years maybe 10 years probably um but you'd really made a huge impression on me and so when you looked me up um i was eager to see you and um and honestly it's one of the most rewarding things of being a counselor at times is when people kind of track me down down the road and are like uh i'm doing well on my journey even if you know even if it didn't have its stumbles along the way um but i just remember you walked in and um you're this beautiful little girl that could barely walk and um and i i obviously knew right away you were doing well because your presence and and who you were um and i remember even on that day angela like i was hoping that one day you would work with us and were you working at a different program at the time i can't remember i wasn't quite yet but soon after you and i met then i started working in treatment at a different program yeah at an entry level technician job but i think through my experience with you um but also feeling um that you cared for me back then and you never pushed me away or said you're doing this wrong you just met me where i was and i think that that along with other people in my recovery journey made the most impact that oh i know how to care for people and i think that that's kind of what sparked my interest in wanting to work in treatment that um if there's anything i knew how to do it was care about somebody yet how like i mean share how we met like do you want to talk about that so we met when i was i believe i was 17 years old 17 or 16. and at the time it was very early on in my addiction so i'd only been using for maybe a year or two at the time um i also struggled with eating disorders i had terrible relationships with men so i was just kind of all over the map i wouldn't listen to my parents my mom lived out here in colorado my dad lived in vegas and so i definitely used that dynamic to my advantage to get what i wanted and which really put me in a position of not being able to accept help because there was a way out so my mom contacted you and i started seeing jason individually who do i talk to you okay talk to me yeah um i started seeing you individually yeah and i think at the time i was nowhere near ready even admitting that i had any kind of problem um i was in a relationship that was unhealthy at the time uh him and i were using together and so again i had a way out from looking at my problems so you tried your best um and you're good i gave\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eyeah you know and i had wonderful family support i just wasn't willing to look at my own problems so you know your recommendation time after time was you need to go in inpatient yeah and i was just not having it i think i even remember you bringing my parents into our session and sitting us all down and saying this is what's happening and as soon as i saw everybody i was out i left the office i was like nope not doing this yeah i left and um yeah that's that's how we first met and then i think from there we lost contact i went back to vegas and that's really where um you know i really dove deep into my addiction from there that makes sense yeah and i love that too because we're talking trauma informed before it was cool right there and that's that's what i saw there is and i think you know there was a tremendous amount of intensity in the field 10 years ago to say let's lock her away and throw away the key and let's tell her the decision she's making is wrong and let's draw a hard line in the sand and let's make sure she loses everything just to get her into treatment but what you did and what she spoke to was you just let her know that she has a seat here no matter what and whenever you're ready i'm gonna be here and i just i tend to believe it's through a lot of interactions like that that recoveries are built and it becomes safe so i just wanted to say that it's just it was trauma informed before it was cool yeah yeah and i think that that was impactful to me because at the time i didn't really have anything um i didn't really care about anything in my life that i was scared of losing so i was comfortable having nothing and i think that the part that was hard for me was letting somebody care for me because had i let that happen there's endless amount of people that would have i i just couldn't see that in myself that i was deserving of that yet um so i think that that maybe um is why i remembered you even years and years later was that feeling that like oh he cared for me when i didn't even give a [ __ ] about myself yeah yeah and planning that a little teary if you keep talking like that it's really powerful um\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eand it is it is weird to me because like i i do remember it like it was last week like when you were over there and and uh and then we'll talk about kind of then how did you how did you get sober you don't i know we've talked you probably talked about that in here a little bit before but like how did you get sober and then i i do want to ask some other questions about now then too sure so what happened from there i went back to vegas and my life just took a dive i was in a relationship um that was very unhealthy so between you know the codependent dynamic that we had i'm not sure what came first really my addiction to him or the addiction to drugs and so eventually i found heroin and um i had tried to get sober i you know a couple years in i was like all right i give i i have enough like let's try this and you know i attempted sobriety it didn't stick i attempted again i went to treatment didn't stick it in the same time i was dealing with an eating disorder so you know if it wasn't one it was the other and at the time i just felt like there's really no hope for me so you know i tried um and then when i was 19 years old my ex-boyfriend he he passed away from from an overdose and i think that that's what made me um realize that i wasn't invincible and also made me feel like i had nothing left to live for so you know i started doing speed balls after that and i went to california for a while to try to get sober but ended up down on skid row because that's where i could find drugs i mean so you know i was using down there and a bunch of places in between you know to i went to memphis tennessee i went to out here in colorado to try to get sober to california and i just tried to get away from essentially myself and it wasn't sticking so the last time i went to treatment my story is that i went to treatment 10 times before i finally got sober and that's definitely not everybody's experience and i never hope for anybody to go through that but for me that's what it took and i and i'm grateful for that but number 10 i went to treatment and i week in i was like okay i'm gonna use and once it was in my mind i was like okay this is what i'm doing and so i left a weekend and i used and it was the worst 24 hours of my life um i didn't use any of the substances that i had convinced myself i was addicted to uh you know up until then i blamed it on the drugs i was using or you know if you tried heroin then you would be addicted too and in that 24 hours i didn't use anything i was addicted to and i could not stop so i was convinced at that time that okay this is me that's the problem you know it's not the driving it's not my family it's not my parents it's me and i called the treatment center and i asked them if i could come back and i think that that was the first moment that i ever trusted anything bigger than myself and i ever showed a bit of humility and i asked to come back and they let me and that made the biggest difference all the other programs i had gotten kicked out of or when i relapsed they said you weren't welcome back and so when they welcomed me back um i went back but not only did they let me come back they were grateful that i was alive and they were grateful that i was not giving up on myself and from then i just decided to take suggestions and you know everything didn't happen at once i didn't become a healthy normal individual as soon as i stopped using drugs i had trauma to work through i had depression anxiety wow i had no idea that you run skid row so i go every every well the last two years um and when i go and visit places inner cities urban areas i like to run from where i'm at today where i've been and always to come back to where i want to be and it's a really spiritual thing and so i'll do these runs through skid row and you know i just i miss all of that when i meet you because i meet the professional and i meet the person sitting in our lobby who is convicted to be the best mother on earth and will do anything for her child and her recovery and that's how i came to know angela was this great integris woman in recovery great mother great values\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ebig hearts and so to hear a story like that it kind of makes me sad because you're right you are worth so much more than that but oftentimes our stories our pain our shame whatever it is lead us to a place where we're isolated and all alone and disconnected but it is just so rewarding to see your recovery intention today in the way that you live your life which is attractive to each and every person you have the opportunity to come into contact with i mean it is truly something that people want more in their lives today is your resolve and your energy and your compassion and your love so much so that i didn't mention it on the front end but angela started out as what we call now a cca client care aid and i think it was probably a house manager back then and she was a graveyard overnight manager and she took a weekend yeah that's where i started just her best shift the best shift ever she took a three dollar pay cut and came to peak's recovery um tell me about that experience of taking that pay cut why did you do it how'd you do it yeah so i was working at another program and you know initially\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ewhat i've learned i guess in my recovery is that the most important thing to me is leading with my heart and you know i just want to help people i want to care about people i know what it's like to be at the bottom and what i remember from people that tried to help me is that um that care so for me i just wanted to be in any kind of avenue in the treatment you know industry so i started off as a technician with a corporate program so i was making a little bit more but eventually i didn't feel any heart i didn't feel useful um i felt like i just handed out cigarettes and that was it so i was like okay this is just not for me and it was like okay this is three dollars more but at what cost and the cost was at me not feeling useful and really feeling drained by helping people and that's never my hope so you know i knew of peace because of jason and i when i had come to see him so i was like you know what i believe in that program and um i printed off my resume and i walked into the office and um rachel tap she interviewed me in that moment and you know the only shift they had available was overnight on the weekends to me that was small compared to the three dollars and the pay cut because it was something that was meaningful to me so what my wife looked like at the time i was a single mom already of my daughter who was one and a half so there's no daycare on the weekends so i would work 12 hours overnight and then i would pick her up from pueblo where my sister lived drive back try to take a nap while my one and a half year old is tearing up the house and then drop her off and go back to work for 12 hours and then monday morning then she would be able to go to school and i would be able to sleep and so that that's what my life looked like and then you know from there i think um what made the biggest difference for me professionally is just acting out of integrity and putting my heart first even in what i do um as a job so i think from there i was able to work my way up through the company yeah it's a really beautiful thing and then i think we do mean to actually lose you back to the almost almost and then we're like no no we'll just let's just pay her that three bucks she's worth all of it and now angela is an admission specialist she brings people in on the front end of treatment and if my sons god forbid would ever have to go to treatment i can't think of somebody that i would want them to get on the phone with other than you because you're going to lead with that heart you're going to make them feel safe you're going to tell them that they're valuable even when they don't believe it and that's the type of people that i want in and around my recovery circle in and around our treatment program and in our communities and can you talk a little bit about what that admissions job has kind of changed for you professionally what is it like to really have those families on the front end a lot of times very vulnerable i mean the work that you do is so precious and has to be so precise and the family often times is like clay yeah and sometimes people do poorly with that clay yeah and i think you do just a magnificent job um filled with integrity and so what what has that been like for you transitioning from like client-centered to more centered yeah so i think for me what i remind the families that i am working with is that we all have the same goal nobody wants to live their life you know doing drugs and living in this burden of mental health and so nobody wants to be there and there's no right way to get to recovery i think that a lot of the tension between families comes because one person thinks there's a right way and typically the client is like no that's not the right way to support me which is there's probably truth in that somewhere so i think that that's the biggest thing i remember is that okay we all have the same goal here and how do we get there and then also making them um you know feel like they're not alone in this um i think even if i don't tell them specifically i want them to feel that that you know there's they've been hurting their loved one has been hurting and there's a solution for that and so i think that that's just always my hope is every time i take the call is that okay make them feel like they are not alone and i think that that makes the world of difference um is for somebody to feel like they have somebody to support them yeah and then that you can relate to and i love the way that you can relate with families and people and even if it's not necessarily your story you do a really cool job of allowing them to see their story in yours and i think that's a really cool unique professional and personal trait that you have is really highlighting a story that might be a bit different but enabling that story or enabling them to see their story in that so that relatability and that safety right away i just think you do such a phenomenal job with that because when you were telling your story i never was on skid row but damn i felt like i connected with that you know really really well and so i just really appreciate you coming on here today and really just talking about some of those things that are near and dear to your heart in your recovery process that is so intimate to you and your family and i've just really got a tremendous amount of gratitude for who you are what you're about and what you do on a daily basis and i couldn't celebrate you more both personally professionally and you're amazing mother an amazing professional amazing person and that bright light just exudes off of you so thank you so much for coming in today jason as always chief clinical officer admission specialist cheerleader\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eit's been it's been awesome opportunity having you all on today um i appreciate you coming on and spending some time on this sorry about the technical difficulties that's what people with big hearts do they don't pay attention to wires sometimes it goes a loop thank you so much please find us on spotify facebook instagram wherever you get your podcast we love you big hearts big smiles peaks recovery let's go\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e"} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq-child uagb-faq-child__outer-wrap uagb-block-4f330be1"> <div class="uagb-faq-child__wrapper"> <div class="uagb-faq-item" role="tab"> <div class="uagb-faq-questions-button uagb-faq-questions"> <span class="uagb-question">Episode 21 Transcript</span></div> <div class="uagb-faq-content"><span><br /> <br /></span> <p><span>good afternoon everybody and welcome to the finding peaks recovery show i have two great friends here angela lopez who's a personal friend of mine and also a professional that works with peaks recovery and then my man mr j freeze happy to be here today happy to have this group together really excited about the topic of conversation today which is we're just gonna open it up with big hearts big smiles and kick it over to my man jay but what i'm gonna say really quickly is these two have had a relationship um a clinical relationship before they had a personal relationship and so we just kind of wanted to start today's video talking about some of those early stages of angela's recovery or even before she um ended up getting sober this time in some of his early stages as a new clinician coming out of school and working with someone like angela so we're just going to get this thing going um and talk with jason first and just what was that experience like or what is the experience like to see a professional a person in recovery with integrity who has helped a tremendous amount of people not only get well get clean to be a connector in the community seeing where you saw her initially and then getting to see her now what is what is that like for you</span></p> <p><span>and great question chris i think you know we were talking before the show started as we do and i was really reflecting on the day angela tracked me down which was what five years five years ago probably four and a half or five years ago um and i had known her like you said from even many years before that when i had less gray hair and i had more hair i apparently dressed terribly but um</span></p> <p><span>but i do think uh that day um it was i remember i was downstairs at our center um in our women's program that at the time and um angela tracked me down and i hadn't talked to you i don't know how long what like 10 years maybe 10 years probably um but you'd really made a huge impression on me and so when you looked me up um i was eager to see you and um and honestly it's one of the most rewarding things of being a counselor at times is when people kind of track me down down the road and are like uh i'm doing well on my journey even if you know even if it didn't have its stumbles along the way um but i just remember you walked in and um you're this beautiful little girl that could barely walk and um and i i obviously knew right away you were doing well because your presence and and who you were um and i remember even on that day angela like i was hoping that one day you would work with us and were you working at a different program at the time i can't remember i wasn't quite yet but soon after you and i met then i started working in treatment at a different program yeah at an entry level technician job but i think through my experience with you um but also feeling um that you cared for me back then and you never pushed me away or said you're doing this wrong you just met me where i was and i think that that along with other people in my recovery journey made the most impact that oh i know how to care for people and i think that that's kind of what sparked my interest in wanting to work in treatment that um if there's anything i knew how to do it was care about somebody yet how like i mean share how we met like do you want to talk about that so we met when i was i believe i was 17 years old 17 or 16. and at the time it was very early on in my addiction so i'd only been using for maybe a year or two at the time um i also struggled with eating disorders i had terrible relationships with men so i was just kind of all over the map i wouldn't listen to my parents my mom lived out here in colorado my dad lived in vegas and so i definitely used that dynamic to my advantage to get what i wanted and which really put me in a position of not being able to accept help because there was a way out so my mom contacted you and i started seeing jason individually who do i talk to you okay talk to me yeah um i started seeing you individually yeah and i think at the time i was nowhere near ready even admitting that i had any kind of problem um i was in a relationship that was unhealthy at the time uh him and i were using together and so again i had a way out from looking at my problems so you tried your best um and you're good i gave</span></p> <p><span>yeah you know and i had wonderful family support i just wasn't willing to look at my own problems so you know your recommendation time after time was you need to go in inpatient yeah and i was just not having it i think i even remember you bringing my parents into our session and sitting us all down and saying this is what's happening and as soon as i saw everybody i was out i left the office i was like nope not doing this yeah i left and um yeah that's that's how we first met and then i think from there we lost contact i went back to vegas and that's really where um you know i really dove deep into my addiction from there that makes sense yeah and i love that too because we're talking trauma informed before it was cool right there and that's that's what i saw there is and i think you know there was a tremendous amount of intensity in the field 10 years ago to say let's lock her away and throw away the key and let's tell her the decision she's making is wrong and let's draw a hard line in the sand and let's make sure she loses everything just to get her into treatment but what you did and what she spoke to was you just let her know that she has a seat here no matter what and whenever you're ready i'm gonna be here and i just i tend to believe it's through a lot of interactions like that that recoveries are built and it becomes safe so i just wanted to say that it's just it was trauma informed before it was cool yeah yeah and i think that that was impactful to me because at the time i didn't really have anything um i didn't really care about anything in my life that i was scared of losing so i was comfortable having nothing and i think that the part that was hard for me was letting somebody care for me because had i let that happen there's endless amount of people that would have i i just couldn't see that in myself that i was deserving of that yet um so i think that that maybe um is why i remembered you even years and years later was that feeling that like oh he cared for me when i didn't even give a [ __ ] about myself yeah yeah and planning that a little teary if you keep talking like that it's really powerful um</span></p> <p><span>and it is it is weird to me because like i i do remember it like it was last week like when you were over there and and uh and then we'll talk about kind of then how did you how did you get sober you don't i know we've talked you probably talked about that in here a little bit before but like how did you get sober and then i i do want to ask some other questions about now then too sure so what happened from there i went back to vegas and my life just took a dive i was in a relationship um that was very unhealthy so between you know the codependent dynamic that we had i'm not sure what came first really my addiction to him or the addiction to drugs and so eventually i found heroin and um i had tried to get sober i you know a couple years in i was like all right i give i i have enough like let's try this and you know i attempted sobriety it didn't stick i attempted again i went to treatment didn't stick it in the same time i was dealing with an eating disorder so you know if it wasn't one it was the other and at the time i just felt like there's really no hope for me so you know i tried um and then when i was 19 years old my ex-boyfriend he he passed away from from an overdose and i think that that's what made me um realize that i wasn't invincible and also made me feel like i had nothing left to live for so you know i started doing speed balls after that and i went to california for a while to try to get sober but ended up down on skid row because that's where i could find drugs i mean so you know i was using down there and a bunch of places in between you know to i went to memphis tennessee i went to out here in colorado to try to get sober to california and i just tried to get away from essentially myself and it wasn't sticking so the last time i went to treatment my story is that i went to treatment 10 times before i finally got sober and that's definitely not everybody's experience and i never hope for anybody to go through that but for me that's what it took and i and i'm grateful for that but number 10 i went to treatment and i week in i was like okay i'm gonna use and once it was in my mind i was like okay this is what i'm doing and so i left a weekend and i used and it was the worst 24 hours of my life um i didn't use any of the substances that i had convinced myself i was addicted to uh you know up until then i blamed it on the drugs i was using or you know if you tried heroin then you would be addicted too and in that 24 hours i didn't use anything i was addicted to and i could not stop so i was convinced at that time that okay this is me that's the problem you know it's not the driving it's not my family it's not my parents it's me and i called the treatment center and i asked them if i could come back and i think that that was the first moment that i ever trusted anything bigger than myself and i ever showed a bit of humility and i asked to come back and they let me and that made the biggest difference all the other programs i had gotten kicked out of or when i relapsed they said you weren't welcome back and so when they welcomed me back um i went back but not only did they let me come back they were grateful that i was alive and they were grateful that i was not giving up on myself and from then i just decided to take suggestions and you know everything didn't happen at once i didn't become a healthy normal individual as soon as i stopped using drugs i had trauma to work through i had depression anxiety wow i had no idea that you run skid row so i go every every well the last two years um and when i go and visit places inner cities urban areas i like to run from where i'm at today where i've been and always to come back to where i want to be and it's a really spiritual thing and so i'll do these runs through skid row and you know i just i miss all of that when i meet you because i meet the professional and i meet the person sitting in our lobby who is convicted to be the best mother on earth and will do anything for her child and her recovery and that's how i came to know angela was this great integris woman in recovery great mother great values</span></p> <p><span>big hearts and so to hear a story like that it kind of makes me sad because you're right you are worth so much more than that but oftentimes our stories our pain our shame whatever it is lead us to a place where we're isolated and all alone and disconnected but it is just so rewarding to see your recovery intention today in the way that you live your life which is attractive to each and every person you have the opportunity to come into contact with i mean it is truly something that people want more in their lives today is your resolve and your energy and your compassion and your love so much so that i didn't mention it on the front end but angela started out as what we call now a cca client care aid and i think it was probably a house manager back then and she was a graveyard overnight manager and she took a weekend yeah that's where i started just her best shift the best shift ever she took a three dollar pay cut and came to peak's recovery um tell me about that experience of taking that pay cut why did you do it how'd you do it yeah so i was working at another program and you know initially</span></p> <p><span>what i've learned i guess in my recovery is that the most important thing to me is leading with my heart and you know i just want to help people i want to care about people i know what it's like to be at the bottom and what i remember from people that tried to help me is that um that care so for me i just wanted to be in any kind of avenue in the treatment you know industry so i started off as a technician with a corporate program so i was making a little bit more but eventually i didn't feel any heart i didn't feel useful um i felt like i just handed out cigarettes and that was it so i was like okay this is just not for me and it was like okay this is three dollars more but at what cost and the cost was at me not feeling useful and really feeling drained by helping people and that's never my hope so you know i knew of peace because of jason and i when i had come to see him so i was like you know what i believe in that program and um i printed off my resume and i walked into the office and um rachel tap she interviewed me in that moment and you know the only shift they had available was overnight on the weekends to me that was small compared to the three dollars and the pay cut because it was something that was meaningful to me so what my wife looked like at the time i was a single mom already of my daughter who was one and a half so there's no daycare on the weekends so i would work 12 hours overnight and then i would pick her up from pueblo where my sister lived drive back try to take a nap while my one and a half year old is tearing up the house and then drop her off and go back to work for 12 hours and then monday morning then she would be able to go to school and i would be able to sleep and so that that's what my life looked like and then you know from there i think um what made the biggest difference for me professionally is just acting out of integrity and putting my heart first even in what i do um as a job so i think from there i was able to work my way up through the company yeah it's a really beautiful thing and then i think we do mean to actually lose you back to the almost almost and then we're like no no we'll just let's just pay her that three bucks she's worth all of it and now angela is an admission specialist she brings people in on the front end of treatment and if my sons god forbid would ever have to go to treatment i can't think of somebody that i would want them to get on the phone with other than you because you're going to lead with that heart you're going to make them feel safe you're going to tell them that they're valuable even when they don't believe it and that's the type of people that i want in and around my recovery circle in and around our treatment program and in our communities and can you talk a little bit about what that admissions job has kind of changed for you professionally what is it like to really have those families on the front end a lot of times very vulnerable i mean the work that you do is so precious and has to be so precise and the family often times is like clay yeah and sometimes people do poorly with that clay yeah and i think you do just a magnificent job um filled with integrity and so what what has that been like for you transitioning from like client-centered to more centered yeah so i think for me what i remind the families that i am working with is that we all have the same goal nobody wants to live their life you know doing drugs and living in this burden of mental health and so nobody wants to be there and there's no right way to get to recovery i think that a lot of the tension between families comes because one person thinks there's a right way and typically the client is like no that's not the right way to support me which is there's probably truth in that somewhere so i think that that's the biggest thing i remember is that okay we all have the same goal here and how do we get there and then also making them um you know feel like they're not alone in this um i think even if i don't tell them specifically i want them to feel that that you know there's they've been hurting their loved one has been hurting and there's a solution for that and so i think that that's just always my hope is every time i take the call is that okay make them feel like they are not alone and i think that that makes the world of difference um is for somebody to feel like they have somebody to support them yeah and then that you can relate to and i love the way that you can relate with families and people and even if it's not necessarily your story you do a really cool job of allowing them to see their story in yours and i think that's a really cool unique professional and personal trait that you have is really highlighting a story that might be a bit different but enabling that story or enabling them to see their story in that so that relatability and that safety right away i just think you do such a phenomenal job with that because when you were telling your story i never was on skid row but damn i felt like i connected with that you know really really well and so i just really appreciate you coming on here today and really just talking about some of those things that are near and dear to your heart in your recovery process that is so intimate to you and your family and i've just really got a tremendous amount of gratitude for who you are what you're about and what you do on a daily basis and i couldn't celebrate you more both personally professionally and you're amazing mother an amazing professional amazing person and that bright light just exudes off of you so thank you so much for coming in today jason as always chief clinical officer admission specialist cheerleader</span></p> <p><span>it's been it's been awesome opportunity having you all on today um i appreciate you coming on and spending some time on this sorry about the technical difficulties that's what people with big hearts do they don't pay attention to wires sometimes it goes a loop thank you so much please find us on spotify facebook instagram wherever you get your podcast we love you big hearts big smiles peaks recovery let's go</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq-child --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p><!-- wp:block {"ref":1510} /--></p>

Episode 20: The Effects of COVID-19 2021/09/13, 23:35
Episode 20: The Effects of COVID-19

<p> <!-- wp:cover {"url":"https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg","id":4918,"dimRatio":0,"focalPoint":{"x":"0.52","y":"0.50"},"align":"center","className":"nvd-bg-div"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-cover aligncenter nvd-bg-div"><img class="img-responsive" class= "wp-block-cover__image-background wp-image-4918" alt="" src= "https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg" style="object-position:52% 50%" data-object-fit="cover" data-object-position="52% 50%" /> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","level":1,"textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --> <h1 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-episode-20">Episode 20</h1> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --></p> <h2 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-the-effects-of-covid-19">The Effects of Covid-19</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cover --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"9f05e21a","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/columns {"block_id":"25249fa8","classMigrate":true,"leftPadding":0,"rightPadding":0} --> <div class="uagb-columns__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-columns__inner-wrap uagb-columns__columns-2"> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"e7a6f4a9","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-e7a6f4a9"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-watch-now">Watch Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:embed {"url":"https://youtu.be/K_9wHqVTi-0","type":"video","providerNameSlug":"youtube","responsive":true,"className":"wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper"> https://youtu.be/K_9wHqVTi-0</div> <p><!-- /wp:embed --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"259df93b","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-259df93b"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-listen-now">Listen Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> <div class="wp-block-create-block-libsyn-podcasting-block"> <div class="libsyn-shortcode"></div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:create-block/libsyn-podcasting-block --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/columns --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"bd988521","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-20-1">Episode 20</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Our team talks about how COVID-19 has affected recovery journeys, the overall mental health of individuals, and how treatment centers provide care.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Topics:</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:list --></p> <ul> <li>How COVID required treatment centers to shift tremendously and how Peaks Recovery adapted</li> <li>How COVID gave treatment providers a chance to better their quality of care and grow in ways they weren’t aware of in the beginning.</li> <li>How Peaks saw a shift in the dynamic of calls/clients due to the isolation COVID brought forth</li> </ul> <p><!-- /wp:list --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"c2490abf","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#225b67"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","style":{"color":{"text":"#fff351"}}} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center has-text-color" id= "h-select-quotes" style="color:#fff351">Select Quotes</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/blockquote {"block_id":"c2fd547f","classMigrate":true,"descriptionText":"For any addiction treatment center that was paying attention during that time there were incredible opportunities to learn more and grow as an institution and 100% forced that growth almost immediately.","descColor":"#ffffff","author":"Brandon Burns\u003cbr\u003e","authorColor":"#ffffff","enableTweet":false} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-blockquote uagb-blockquote__outer-wrap uagb-block-c2fd547f"> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__wrap uagb-blockquote__skin-border uagb-blockquote__stack-img-none"> <blockquote class="uagb-blockquote"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content-wrap"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content">For any addiction treatment center that was paying attention during that time there were incredible opportunities to learn more and grow as an institution and 100% forced that growth almost immediately.</div> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__author-wrap uagb-blockquote__author-at-left"> <cite class="uagb-blockquote__author">Brandon Burns<br /></cite></div> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/blockquote --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"540b18ef","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"none","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-transcripts"> Episode Transcripts</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/faq {"block_id":"f4673f73","schema":"{\u0022@context\u0022:\u0022https://schema.org\u0022,\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022FAQPage\u0022,\u0022@id\u0022:\u0022https://peaksrecovery.com/blog/uncategorized/episode-20-the-effects-of-covid-19/\u0022,\u0022mainEntity\u0022:[{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Question\u0022,\u0022name\u0022:\u0022Episode 20 Transcript\u0022,\u0022acceptedAnswer\u0022:{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Answer\u0022,\u0022text\u0022:\u0022\u003cbr\u003ehere we are again good to be back good to be in the hot seat the host seat another finding peaks episode here so today we're bringing forward uh because the viewers the people on the other side of this camera have been interested in i know this world talks about covet all the time and for very good reasons but the viewers have been interested in what does that look like i think within addiction treatment culture and also too what are those sort of dynamics the features of it that we're starting to see maybe starting to take place you know within current programming and to just talk about that a little bit so excuse me viewers for having my phone out here but we've got some data on this and so what took place during addiction treatment um as the height of covid was taking place was there was a lot of movement to telehealth practices to create that distance uh and so forth an addiction treatment culture but the data is in and so what it kind of looked like within addiction treatment culture was 85 percent of all treatment was delivered face-to-face and telehealth sort of a back and forth 82 of all treatment was delivered face-to-face still an inpatient program and 69 of all treatment was delivered telehealth only uh during the pandemic or certainly during the height of all of the lockdowns and so forth what's interesting about the data is that uh 91 satisfaction with face-to-face and telehealth uh 85 satisfaction with face-to-face only and 76 satisfaction with telehealth only which lets us know that in some way telehealth wasn't totally satisfying to our patient demographic so i'll just read a few quotes here from that survey i very much need to be at in-person groups these telehealth stuff has been very hard for me especially when people are in the group and they never reveal their faces this other comment is very straightforward zoom sucks\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eit really put a damper on my recovery i didn't like the zoom meetings it wasn't like in person meetings going from regular person meetings where there were bonds and physical embraces with other fellow addicts to the zoom meetings made me feel more isolated and depressed uh the zoom sessions are still challenging because we can't hear everything people say so technology issues there and finally zoom meetings are a great in a pinch however i don't get the same benefits as i would from in-person meetings so my takeaway from the reading of that is that first and foremost there's a big part of recovery journeys is about interdependence right connection and so forth and um where am i going with this so having some interdependence and connecting features it seems like we got a bit away from that in telehealth strategies and i know at pink's we had a ton of challenges because we didn't have internet and all these sort of features about it but you know kind of going back and reviewing namely what it was like for us jason at that time what was your experience about being an inpatient program at that time and what we saw from the patient demographic because we couldn't bring in outside services we couldn't bring them off campus and all these sort of features and i definitely want to recognize that i think it caused something it definitely caused something it's interesting listening to you talk because i when i go back in that period of time first of all one of my first reactions was i felt a lot of frustration frankly with um some of the national organizing bodies in our field that we got no direction for how to proceed in a pandemic and like i remember even like five or six years ago when we were writing our uh policies around for the joint commission you know i think we probably had a pandemic response page or something and uh it did no good like we had a completely paragraph yeah yeah and i remember there was a day uh where um i think one of our clients like this is way early on like just when the pandemic was beginning where the we had a client with a fever and like we just we sent all clinicians home and we're like we're gonna we're gonna go all online it was just a very reactive period i think the world was afraid it didn't we didn't know how to adjust and cope to it and then we had no direction i think um from anybody frankly and and so we were making it up on the fly and um i think it took us uh right around i don't know 15 minutes to figure out that going all zoom was going to be a huge mistake\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003etrying to manage a room none of us were trained on how to do teletherapy either and there wasn't a class and at least my master's program about how to do uh telehealth courses when i did my master's program there wasn't internet that wasn't yeah it was carrier pigeons but we couldn't even figure that out um but i do think you know overall what we ended up doing at peaks is we created a couple different clinical teams actually that would come in for seven days and then be off for seven days and i'm not sure that was the best plan either however uh from that model we started to figure a thing out where the clients were on our campus and we got to put on these seven day kind of intensives as each team came in uh we we did kind of an intensive week where seven days in a row they had the same clinicians and then those clinicians were off and the next crew came on and so from that actually uh we birthed some remnants of that as our current curriculum honestly that we we found that really taking a topic instead of having one group a week for the course of their stay but how about taking a week and actually having a topic for a week created a level of depth to the topic and the continuity and a real cohesion uh amongst the clients so that they had um one topic to work on i don't know if that answered your question only brandon but like i that was my recollection of it it was rough um and we learned some things from it yeah put it in a sentence um and thank you for uh yielding that question because it was pretty open-ended and abroad yeah you did great there was one question yeah really things were greatly frustrated during that time but i think what's uh unique about this as well too you know clint you weren't with us in that inpatient model but you were working for an opioid treatment program known as otp models that exist out there as a clinic and so i think that adds some you know flavor and perspective as well too to what that dynamic was like for those operations and sort of curious in an entirely different setting in that regard what that looked like for you guys in that going through that yeah it was um much different i mean uh the outpatient world um we went essentially overnight we went 100 telehealth at least with the counseling component of the programming we also had the medical component where people would come in daily for medication and rather than you know a small campus of people we were serving across the three clinics around like maybe 1200 people so the risk of transmission and the fear and the uh was incredible and we were limited you can only bring like 10 people into a facility at a time and that included staff members so we had these huge lines of people around buildings um it was a it was chaotic in a different way uh and logistically was um challenging for sure but to jason's point earlier like there you know i was at the time in charge of um you know quality assurance and documentation and so basically got kind of pegged um along with the other leadership numbers to to create a telehealth program out of out of thin air basically because there was even though i went to school and graduated at a later date than jason there was still no telehealth training it's kind of always been some a fringe kind of thing that um again overnight had to become the forefront method for communication and delivery of services so uh i remember going to training after training we would just find random trainings wherever we could plug yourself in um try to get some insight into what the um the world was doing not only from a clinical perspective but also from a medical perspective because those clinics have both components so it it was um it was intense and uh but it was effective you know and it worked and we were able to nail something down and again like um take different pieces of that and build better programming overall yeah and i think the biggest thing that i learned from that was it actually forced a different level of communication like um now at peaks we use uh like google chat right um or a lot of people were using at the time um we were using a microsoft platform but they're the sort of like chat message culture that where everything became very much real-time um access to individuals within interdisciplinary teams actually improved in those moments so i think that the actual that the cohesion within the um within staff became much much much better like the everything became real time there was not nearly as much lag and there was uh it kind of forced everybody to really talk to one another so for that i think that's the one thing that i took out of it that i think we will just never go away at least you know you you talking about that clinton i we have three different campuses right we have our men's campus or women's and then our administrative campus and i hadn't thought of this but we used to really feel very separate before code like everything felt so separate but now it is nothing to have meetings with people in person and on video and so though i think the clinical challenges are there i do think our meetings and the quality of the meetings are the same virtually or um in person which i think is another interesting shift like to even comprehend having video meetings it just wasn't a thing and i think we're all much more tech savvy now i mean it just kind of you've had to become tech savvy and now even though we're not uh we do focus almost really on the in-person exchange for clinical services and medical services at the residential level i think that we know how to utilize these technological these these technical components in order to actually accentuate rather than replace the sort of programming that we have and um yeah i mean you guys have three campuses and at the time i was working for three clinics in three different cities so being able to communicate to every single clinician at the same time with the most recent up-to-date information i think that now um that same sort of practice happens at peaks and i think it and just keeps again everything is all about right now you know there's no lag and i think that the quality of care for the client has greatly improved and benefited because of it yeah absolutely i mean if for any addiction treatment center that was paying attention during that time there was incredible opportunities to learn more and grow as an institution and i think 100 percent it forced that growth almost immediately i remember just sitting myself in my dinner table at uh at my house at night time trying to figure out how to use gmf and you know it software and the sort of thing to connect ipads to put into patient rooms and that sort of thing and keep people separated and distanced and you know so in that regard it was real time learning how to do things with limited resources to be able to pull it off and so you know sort of invigorating in hindsight and certainly propelled uh you know our company forward i'm sure many addiction treatment cultures forward at that point as well too but also thinking about you know so logistically the industry should have gotten better in a variety of different ways but there is you know at the same time with all the social distancing the public health orders that limited people and travel and all that sort of stuff created a lot of isolation for individuals and overworking particularly for our company and supporting our admissions department over the past seven weeks or so i hear it a lot on the phones that i was a sort of normal drinker i felt like prior to the pandemic i got isolated and then just me sitting in my home with that bottle it became my next friend my best friend in fact in that regard and so in many ways that lack of interdependence and that isolation caused significant issues for individuals who otherwise may have just been on normie style journeys in that regard but mental health acuity seemingly went up and certainly addiction i think went up as a natural result of that especially in alcoholism so i've heard it on the phone certainly brought people into the center you know who've had that story and then you know now in your guys experiences and hearing you know in group settings and individual settings what does that kind of look like that we can share with the viewers of what this has caused through that clinical lens yeah there developed a new demographic of client that i hadn't seen before and it were there particularly service workers right that got laid off um and then got unemployment checks that were i had a lot of people come to me and say i made more money on unemployment um than i had ever made in my life and i was sitting alone sitting at home alone and then there's an app that i don't really care to advertise where they could order liquor delivered to their house every day and it created a perfect storm of really young service industry alcoholics and we have started to see them uh come to peaks where to your point maybe you know maybe they push some boundaries with how much they drink but being at home and being isolated and then having access to an entire liquor store through their phone that would be delivered and having more money than they've ever had with no really other way to spend it um it created this this demographic of people that were really isolated alone and not to mention i mean the overdoses are through the roof last year right i think that that data is in and clear um and suicides are up dramatically as well that isolation piece um is certainly a hidden uh component of this pandemic that you know we feel we're still we are still feeling the reverberations of that i think absolutely and i think it goes to that idea um you know that the opposite of addiction is connection correct yeah so this this in this lack of connection um triggered or pushed over the edge people that were maybe already teetering or feeling slightly disconnected or maybe i don't know if you're like me work is a huge connection you know like i that's all i do because you know you know that very well yeah you guys are my best friends yeah this is your social time right now yeah flower right here this is the best 15 minutes of my week\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ebut i think that losing it it shows i think as a society how important it is for us to stay connected to one another and when we don't feel connected we have this void that sort of forms and we're gonna fill that void of however we can and at the time there when you can't leave your house i mean you what else are you gonna do netflix will only take you so far so when i think it i mean it is an interesting point because yeah on the flip side of that you know we are you know my experience during the pandemic too is that like i saw my family and then i saw my work family and that is it i didn't see my extended family for months and months i didn't see my friends you know like we just we all got very isolated and to your point like fortunately we worked in an industry that needed to keep showing up and being on campus and like what a grace that was honestly because you know when i've had these clients come in and are like i was at home getting a 600 a week check\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eum part of me is like yeah that had been me i don't know how to cope with that that's crazy and even being you know watching people you know having our whole clinical staff work from home right like starting off you know people are they they look okay in the beginning because i i mean you're you're doing video calls all day long you know i always made a real effort to always do face-to-face calls like make sure like hey turn your camera on i want to see you um i just think it's important for us to be able to connect and see one another um but there is a sort of steady grade of that a decline of mental health in general because i think even that virtual connection it's better than nothing but it's no replacement and i think that kind of speaks to the data that you mentioned at the very top of this that the that need for actual interaction and connection even within a physical place even if you're not touching there's just some sort of like energetic mumbo jumbo that's happening that actually helps us stay healthy and stay i don't know human yeah yeah when it never\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ei have never read in any textbook in our field where an entire population is going through a shared trauma right clinicians clients like some of those walls of like it started to come down that we were all kind of in it absolutely and we were all kind of this wasn't like i'm counting i'm providing this counseling it's like well we're all kind of trying to survive right and i remember too like if clients wanted to leave during that time i'm like can i explain to you what the outside world is like you are you have more social connection in here you have more freedom in here you have a basketball hoop yeah you have all these things you can do in here you go home you don't have any of this good for retention brandon but yeah right yeah so uh well i think i think this is great because it ties into the initial data that i was talking it was well to hear that that fallout and that negativity as an experience it wasn't all negative but certainly and certainly individuals experienced telehealth in a positive aspect but what they lost was that connecting piece of it what inpatient programs lost at the same time was the ability to bring outside sources and connecting you know pieces into treatment in that regard and as well too as the pandemic continues to thrive in a variety of ways with the delta variant delta plus the lambda variance and all these sort of things what is happening that i want to be clear with the world about in front of us is that addiction treatment centers aren't armed with public health orders or any of this sort of piece at this time and so the general propensity for somebody who comes in and tests positive for covid is that they are going to be removed from the treatment setting and not able to access care and with that signing off thanks for joining us again here at finding peeks um find us on the socials the facebooks the instagrams the podcast please be sure to email us findingpeakspeaksrecovery.com for more insights and questions again to this covid piece that we're doing here today is because of the viewers you called on us to speak to it a little bit so we are always going to deliver you know answers moving forward on for the questions that you have so thanks again for joining us love you all stay safe until next time you\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u0022}}]}"} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq uagb-faq__outer-wrap uagb-block-f4673f73 uagb-faq-icon-row uagb-faq-layout-accordion uagb-faq-expand-first-false uagb-faq-inactive-other-true uagb-faq-equal-height" data-faqtoggle="true" role="tablist"> <div class="uagb-faq__wrap uagb-buttons-layout-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/faq-child {"block_id":"47159f28","question":"Episode 20 Transcript","answer":"\u003cbr\u003ehere we are again good to be back good to be in the hot seat the host seat another finding peaks episode here so today we're bringing forward uh because the viewers the people on the other side of this camera have been interested in i know this world talks about covet all the time and for very good reasons but the viewers have been interested in what does that look like i think within addiction treatment culture and also too what are those sort of dynamics the features of it that we're starting to see maybe starting to take place you know within current programming and to just talk about that a little bit so excuse me viewers for having my phone out here but we've got some data on this and so what took place during addiction treatment um as the height of covid was taking place was there was a lot of movement to telehealth practices to create that distance uh and so forth an addiction treatment culture but the data is in and so what it kind of looked like within addiction treatment culture was 85 percent of all treatment was delivered face-to-face and telehealth sort of a back and forth 82 of all treatment was delivered face-to-face still an inpatient program and 69 of all treatment was delivered telehealth only uh during the pandemic or certainly during the height of all of the lockdowns and so forth what's interesting about the data is that uh 91 satisfaction with face-to-face and telehealth uh 85 satisfaction with face-to-face only and 76 satisfaction with telehealth only which lets us know that in some way telehealth wasn't totally satisfying to our patient demographic so i'll just read a few quotes here from that survey i very much need to be at in-person groups these telehealth stuff has been very hard for me especially when people are in the group and they never reveal their faces this other comment is very straightforward zoom sucks\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eit really put a damper on my recovery i didn't like the zoom meetings it wasn't like in person meetings going from regular person meetings where there were bonds and physical embraces with other fellow addicts to the zoom meetings made me feel more isolated and depressed uh the zoom sessions are still challenging because we can't hear everything people say so technology issues there and finally zoom meetings are a great in a pinch however i don't get the same benefits as i would from in-person meetings so my takeaway from the reading of that is that first and foremost there's a big part of recovery journeys is about interdependence right connection and so forth and um where am i going with this so having some interdependence and connecting features it seems like we got a bit away from that in telehealth strategies and i know at pink's we had a ton of challenges because we didn't have internet and all these sort of features about it but you know kind of going back and reviewing namely what it was like for us jason at that time what was your experience about being an inpatient program at that time and what we saw from the patient demographic because we couldn't bring in outside services we couldn't bring them off campus and all these sort of features and i definitely want to recognize that i think it caused something it definitely caused something it's interesting listening to you talk because i when i go back in that period of time first of all one of my first reactions was i felt a lot of frustration frankly with um some of the national organizing bodies in our field that we got no direction for how to proceed in a pandemic and like i remember even like five or six years ago when we were writing our uh policies around for the joint commission you know i think we probably had a pandemic response page or something and uh it did no good like we had a completely paragraph yeah yeah and i remember there was a day uh where um i think one of our clients like this is way early on like just when the pandemic was beginning where the we had a client with a fever and like we just we sent all clinicians home and we're like we're gonna we're gonna go all online it was just a very reactive period i think the world was afraid it didn't we didn't know how to adjust and cope to it and then we had no direction i think um from anybody frankly and and so we were making it up on the fly and um i think it took us uh right around i don't know 15 minutes to figure out that going all zoom was going to be a huge mistake\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003etrying to manage a room none of us were trained on how to do teletherapy either and there wasn't a class and at least my master's program about how to do uh telehealth courses when i did my master's program there wasn't internet that wasn't yeah it was carrier pigeons but we couldn't even figure that out um but i do think you know overall what we ended up doing at peaks is we created a couple different clinical teams actually that would come in for seven days and then be off for seven days and i'm not sure that was the best plan either however uh from that model we started to figure a thing out where the clients were on our campus and we got to put on these seven day kind of intensives as each team came in uh we we did kind of an intensive week where seven days in a row they had the same clinicians and then those clinicians were off and the next crew came on and so from that actually uh we birthed some remnants of that as our current curriculum honestly that we we found that really taking a topic instead of having one group a week for the course of their stay but how about taking a week and actually having a topic for a week created a level of depth to the topic and the continuity and a real cohesion uh amongst the clients so that they had um one topic to work on i don't know if that answered your question only brandon but like i that was my recollection of it it was rough um and we learned some things from it yeah put it in a sentence um and thank you for uh yielding that question because it was pretty open-ended and abroad yeah you did great there was one question yeah really things were greatly frustrated during that time but i think what's uh unique about this as well too you know clint you weren't with us in that inpatient model but you were working for an opioid treatment program known as otp models that exist out there as a clinic and so i think that adds some you know flavor and perspective as well too to what that dynamic was like for those operations and sort of curious in an entirely different setting in that regard what that looked like for you guys in that going through that yeah it was um much different i mean uh the outpatient world um we went essentially overnight we went 100 telehealth at least with the counseling component of the programming we also had the medical component where people would come in daily for medication and rather than you know a small campus of people we were serving across the three clinics around like maybe 1200 people so the risk of transmission and the fear and the uh was incredible and we were limited you can only bring like 10 people into a facility at a time and that included staff members so we had these huge lines of people around buildings um it was a it was chaotic in a different way uh and logistically was um challenging for sure but to jason's point earlier like there you know i was at the time in charge of um you know quality assurance and documentation and so basically got kind of pegged um along with the other leadership numbers to to create a telehealth program out of out of thin air basically because there was even though i went to school and graduated at a later date than jason there was still no telehealth training it's kind of always been some a fringe kind of thing that um again overnight had to become the forefront method for communication and delivery of services so uh i remember going to training after training we would just find random trainings wherever we could plug yourself in um try to get some insight into what the um the world was doing not only from a clinical perspective but also from a medical perspective because those clinics have both components so it it was um it was intense and uh but it was effective you know and it worked and we were able to nail something down and again like um take different pieces of that and build better programming overall yeah and i think the biggest thing that i learned from that was it actually forced a different level of communication like um now at peaks we use uh like google chat right um or a lot of people were using at the time um we were using a microsoft platform but they're the sort of like chat message culture that where everything became very much real-time um access to individuals within interdisciplinary teams actually improved in those moments so i think that the actual that the cohesion within the um within staff became much much much better like the everything became real time there was not nearly as much lag and there was uh it kind of forced everybody to really talk to one another so for that i think that's the one thing that i took out of it that i think we will just never go away at least you know you you talking about that clinton i we have three different campuses right we have our men's campus or women's and then our administrative campus and i hadn't thought of this but we used to really feel very separate before code like everything felt so separate but now it is nothing to have meetings with people in person and on video and so though i think the clinical challenges are there i do think our meetings and the quality of the meetings are the same virtually or um in person which i think is another interesting shift like to even comprehend having video meetings it just wasn't a thing and i think we're all much more tech savvy now i mean it just kind of you've had to become tech savvy and now even though we're not uh we do focus almost really on the in-person exchange for clinical services and medical services at the residential level i think that we know how to utilize these technological these these technical components in order to actually accentuate rather than replace the sort of programming that we have and um yeah i mean you guys have three campuses and at the time i was working for three clinics in three different cities so being able to communicate to every single clinician at the same time with the most recent up-to-date information i think that now um that same sort of practice happens at peaks and i think it and just keeps again everything is all about right now you know there's no lag and i think that the quality of care for the client has greatly improved and benefited because of it yeah absolutely i mean if for any addiction treatment center that was paying attention during that time there was incredible opportunities to learn more and grow as an institution and i think 100 percent it forced that growth almost immediately i remember just sitting myself in my dinner table at uh at my house at night time trying to figure out how to use gmf and you know it software and the sort of thing to connect ipads to put into patient rooms and that sort of thing and keep people separated and distanced and you know so in that regard it was real time learning how to do things with limited resources to be able to pull it off and so you know sort of invigorating in hindsight and certainly propelled uh you know our company forward i'm sure many addiction treatment cultures forward at that point as well too but also thinking about you know so logistically the industry should have gotten better in a variety of different ways but there is you know at the same time with all the social distancing the public health orders that limited people and travel and all that sort of stuff created a lot of isolation for individuals and overworking particularly for our company and supporting our admissions department over the past seven weeks or so i hear it a lot on the phones that i was a sort of normal drinker i felt like prior to the pandemic i got isolated and then just me sitting in my home with that bottle it became my next friend my best friend in fact in that regard and so in many ways that lack of interdependence and that isolation caused significant issues for individuals who otherwise may have just been on normie style journeys in that regard but mental health acuity seemingly went up and certainly addiction i think went up as a natural result of that especially in alcoholism so i've heard it on the phone certainly brought people into the center you know who've had that story and then you know now in your guys experiences and hearing you know in group settings and individual settings what does that kind of look like that we can share with the viewers of what this has caused through that clinical lens yeah there developed a new demographic of client that i hadn't seen before and it were there particularly service workers right that got laid off um and then got unemployment checks that were i had a lot of people come to me and say i made more money on unemployment um than i had ever made in my life and i was sitting alone sitting at home alone and then there's an app that i don't really care to advertise where they could order liquor delivered to their house every day and it created a perfect storm of really young service industry alcoholics and we have started to see them uh come to peaks where to your point maybe you know maybe they push some boundaries with how much they drink but being at home and being isolated and then having access to an entire liquor store through their phone that would be delivered and having more money than they've ever had with no really other way to spend it um it created this this demographic of people that were really isolated alone and not to mention i mean the overdoses are through the roof last year right i think that that data is in and clear um and suicides are up dramatically as well that isolation piece um is certainly a hidden uh component of this pandemic that you know we feel we're still we are still feeling the reverberations of that i think absolutely and i think it goes to that idea um you know that the opposite of addiction is connection correct yeah so this this in this lack of connection um triggered or pushed over the edge people that were maybe already teetering or feeling slightly disconnected or maybe i don't know if you're like me work is a huge connection you know like i that's all i do because you know you know that very well yeah you guys are my best friends yeah this is your social time right now yeah flower right here this is the best 15 minutes of my week\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ebut i think that losing it it shows i think as a society how important it is for us to stay connected to one another and when we don't feel connected we have this void that sort of forms and we're gonna fill that void of however we can and at the time there when you can't leave your house i mean you what else are you gonna do netflix will only take you so far so when i think it i mean it is an interesting point because yeah on the flip side of that you know we are you know my experience during the pandemic too is that like i saw my family and then i saw my work family and that is it i didn't see my extended family for months and months i didn't see my friends you know like we just we all got very isolated and to your point like fortunately we worked in an industry that needed to keep showing up and being on campus and like what a grace that was honestly because you know when i've had these clients come in and are like i was at home getting a 600 a week check\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003eum part of me is like yeah that had been me i don't know how to cope with that that's crazy and even being you know watching people you know having our whole clinical staff work from home right like starting off you know people are they they look okay in the beginning because i i mean you're you're doing video calls all day long you know i always made a real effort to always do face-to-face calls like make sure like hey turn your camera on i want to see you um i just think it's important for us to be able to connect and see one another um but there is a sort of steady grade of that a decline of mental health in general because i think even that virtual connection it's better than nothing but it's no replacement and i think that kind of speaks to the data that you mentioned at the very top of this that the that need for actual interaction and connection even within a physical place even if you're not touching there's just some sort of like energetic mumbo jumbo that's happening that actually helps us stay healthy and stay i don't know human yeah yeah when it never\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003ei have never read in any textbook in our field where an entire population is going through a shared trauma right clinicians clients like some of those walls of like it started to come down that we were all kind of in it absolutely and we were all kind of this wasn't like i'm counting i'm providing this counseling it's like well we're all kind of trying to survive right and i remember too like if clients wanted to leave during that time i'm like can i explain to you what the outside world is like you are you have more social connection in here you have more freedom in here you have a basketball hoop yeah you have all these things you can do in here you go home you don't have any of this good for retention brandon but yeah right yeah so uh well i think i think this is great because it ties into the initial data that i was talking it was well to hear that that fallout and that negativity as an experience it wasn't all negative but certainly and certainly individuals experienced telehealth in a positive aspect but what they lost was that connecting piece of it what inpatient programs lost at the same time was the ability to bring outside sources and connecting you know pieces into treatment in that regard and as well too as the pandemic continues to thrive in a variety of ways with the delta variant delta plus the lambda variance and all these sort of things what is happening that i want to be clear with the world about in front of us is that addiction treatment centers aren't armed with public health orders or any of this sort of piece at this time and so the general propensity for somebody who comes in and tests positive for covid is that they are going to be removed from the treatment setting and not able to access care and with that signing off thanks for joining us again here at finding peeks um find us on the socials the facebooks the instagrams the podcast please be sure to email us findingpeakspeaksrecovery.com for more insights and questions again to this covid piece that we're doing here today is because of the viewers you called on us to speak to it a little bit so we are always going to deliver you know answers moving forward on for the questions that you have so thanks again for joining us love you all stay safe until next time you\u003cbr\u003e\u003cbr\u003e"} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq-child uagb-faq-child__outer-wrap uagb-block-47159f28"> <div class="uagb-faq-child__wrapper"> <div class="uagb-faq-item" role="tab"> <div class="uagb-faq-questions-button uagb-faq-questions"> <span class="uagb-question">Episode 20 Transcript</span></div> <div class="uagb-faq-content"><span><br /> <br /></span> <p><span>here we are again good to be back good to be in the hot seat the host seat another finding peaks episode here so today we're bringing forward uh because the viewers the people on the other side of this camera have been interested in i know this world talks about covet all the time and for very good reasons but the viewers have been interested in what does that look like i think within addiction treatment culture and also too what are those sort of dynamics the features of it that we're starting to see maybe starting to take place you know within current programming and to just talk about that a little bit so excuse me viewers for having my phone out here but we've got some data on this and so what took place during addiction treatment um as the height of covid was taking place was there was a lot of movement to telehealth practices to create that distance uh and so forth an addiction treatment culture but the data is in and so what it kind of looked like within addiction treatment culture was 85 percent of all treatment was delivered face-to-face and telehealth sort of a back and forth 82 of all treatment was delivered face-to-face still an inpatient program and 69 of all treatment was delivered telehealth only uh during the pandemic or certainly during the height of all of the lockdowns and so forth what's interesting about the data is that uh 91 satisfaction with face-to-face and telehealth uh 85 satisfaction with face-to-face only and 76 satisfaction with telehealth only which lets us know that in some way telehealth wasn't totally satisfying to our patient demographic so i'll just read a few quotes here from that survey i very much need to be at in-person groups these telehealth stuff has been very hard for me especially when people are in the group and they never reveal their faces this other comment is very straightforward zoom sucks</span></p> <p><span>it really put a damper on my recovery i didn't like the zoom meetings it wasn't like in person meetings going from regular person meetings where there were bonds and physical embraces with other fellow addicts to the zoom meetings made me feel more isolated and depressed uh the zoom sessions are still challenging because we can't hear everything people say so technology issues there and finally zoom meetings are a great in a pinch however i don't get the same benefits as i would from in-person meetings so my takeaway from the reading of that is that first and foremost there's a big part of recovery journeys is about interdependence right connection and so forth and um where am i going with this so having some interdependence and connecting features it seems like we got a bit away from that in telehealth strategies and i know at pink's we had a ton of challenges because we didn't have internet and all these sort of features about it but you know kind of going back and reviewing namely what it was like for us jason at that time what was your experience about being an inpatient program at that time and what we saw from the patient demographic because we couldn't bring in outside services we couldn't bring them off campus and all these sort of features and i definitely want to recognize that i think it caused something it definitely caused something it's interesting listening to you talk because i when i go back in that period of time first of all one of my first reactions was i felt a lot of frustration frankly with um some of the national organizing bodies in our field that we got no direction for how to proceed in a pandemic and like i remember even like five or six years ago when we were writing our uh policies around for the joint commission you know i think we probably had a pandemic response page or something and uh it did no good like we had a completely paragraph yeah yeah and i remember there was a day uh where um i think one of our clients like this is way early on like just when the pandemic was beginning where the we had a client with a fever and like we just we sent all clinicians home and we're like we're gonna we're gonna go all online it was just a very reactive period i think the world was afraid it didn't we didn't know how to adjust and cope to it and then we had no direction i think um from anybody frankly and and so we were making it up on the fly and um i think it took us uh right around i don't know 15 minutes to figure out that going all zoom was going to be a huge mistake</span></p> <p><span>trying to manage a room none of us were trained on how to do teletherapy either and there wasn't a class and at least my master's program about how to do uh telehealth courses when i did my master's program there wasn't internet that wasn't yeah it was carrier pigeons but we couldn't even figure that out um but i do think you know overall what we ended up doing at peaks is we created a couple different clinical teams actually that would come in for seven days and then be off for seven days and i'm not sure that was the best plan either however uh from that model we started to figure a thing out where the clients were on our campus and we got to put on these seven day kind of intensives as each team came in uh we we did kind of an intensive week where seven days in a row they had the same clinicians and then those clinicians were off and the next crew came on and so from that actually uh we birthed some remnants of that as our current curriculum honestly that we we found that really taking a topic instead of having one group a week for the course of their stay but how about taking a week and actually having a topic for a week created a level of depth to the topic and the continuity and a real cohesion uh amongst the clients so that they had um one topic to work on i don't know if that answered your question only brandon but like i that was my recollection of it it was rough um and we learned some things from it yeah put it in a sentence um and thank you for uh yielding that question because it was pretty open-ended and abroad yeah you did great there was one question yeah really things were greatly frustrated during that time but i think what's uh unique about this as well too you know clint you weren't with us in that inpatient model but you were working for an opioid treatment program known as otp models that exist out there as a clinic and so i think that adds some you know flavor and perspective as well too to what that dynamic was like for those operations and sort of curious in an entirely different setting in that regard what that looked like for you guys in that going through that yeah it was um much different i mean uh the outpatient world um we went essentially overnight we went 100 telehealth at least with the counseling component of the programming we also had the medical component where people would come in daily for medication and rather than you know a small campus of people we were serving across the three clinics around like maybe 1200 people so the risk of transmission and the fear and the uh was incredible and we were limited you can only bring like 10 people into a facility at a time and that included staff members so we had these huge lines of people around buildings um it was a it was chaotic in a different way uh and logistically was um challenging for sure but to jason's point earlier like there you know i was at the time in charge of um you know quality assurance and documentation and so basically got kind of pegged um along with the other leadership numbers to to create a telehealth program out of out of thin air basically because there was even though i went to school and graduated at a later date than jason there was still no telehealth training it's kind of always been some a fringe kind of thing that um again overnight had to become the forefront method for communication and delivery of services so uh i remember going to training after training we would just find random trainings wherever we could plug yourself in um try to get some insight into what the um the world was doing not only from a clinical perspective but also from a medical perspective because those clinics have both components so it it was um it was intense and uh but it was effective you know and it worked and we were able to nail something down and again like um take different pieces of that and build better programming overall yeah and i think the biggest thing that i learned from that was it actually forced a different level of communication like um now at peaks we use uh like google chat right um or a lot of people were using at the time um we were using a microsoft platform but they're the sort of like chat message culture that where everything became very much real-time um access to individuals within interdisciplinary teams actually improved in those moments so i think that the actual that the cohesion within the um within staff became much much much better like the everything became real time there was not nearly as much lag and there was uh it kind of forced everybody to really talk to one another so for that i think that's the one thing that i took out of it that i think we will just never go away at least you know you you talking about that clinton i we have three different campuses right we have our men's campus or women's and then our administrative campus and i hadn't thought of this but we used to really feel very separate before code like everything felt so separate but now it is nothing to have meetings with people in person and on video and so though i think the clinical challenges are there i do think our meetings and the quality of the meetings are the same virtually or um in person which i think is another interesting shift like to even comprehend having video meetings it just wasn't a thing and i think we're all much more tech savvy now i mean it just kind of you've had to become tech savvy and now even though we're not uh we do focus almost really on the in-person exchange for clinical services and medical services at the residential level i think that we know how to utilize these technological these these technical components in order to actually accentuate rather than replace the sort of programming that we have and um yeah i mean you guys have three campuses and at the time i was working for three clinics in three different cities so being able to communicate to every single clinician at the same time with the most recent up-to-date information i think that now um that same sort of practice happens at peaks and i think it and just keeps again everything is all about right now you know there's no lag and i think that the quality of care for the client has greatly improved and benefited because of it yeah absolutely i mean if for any addiction treatment center that was paying attention during that time there was incredible opportunities to learn more and grow as an institution and i think 100 percent it forced that growth almost immediately i remember just sitting myself in my dinner table at uh at my house at night time trying to figure out how to use gmf and you know it software and the sort of thing to connect ipads to put into patient rooms and that sort of thing and keep people separated and distanced and you know so in that regard it was real time learning how to do things with limited resources to be able to pull it off and so you know sort of invigorating in hindsight and certainly propelled uh you know our company forward i'm sure many addiction treatment cultures forward at that point as well too but also thinking about you know so logistically the industry should have gotten better in a variety of different ways but there is you know at the same time with all the social distancing the public health orders that limited people and travel and all that sort of stuff created a lot of isolation for individuals and overworking particularly for our company and supporting our admissions department over the past seven weeks or so i hear it a lot on the phones that i was a sort of normal drinker i felt like prior to the pandemic i got isolated and then just me sitting in my home with that bottle it became my next friend my best friend in fact in that regard and so in many ways that lack of interdependence and that isolation caused significant issues for individuals who otherwise may have just been on normie style journeys in that regard but mental health acuity seemingly went up and certainly addiction i think went up as a natural result of that especially in alcoholism so i've heard it on the phone certainly brought people into the center you know who've had that story and then you know now in your guys experiences and hearing you know in group settings and individual settings what does that kind of look like that we can share with the viewers of what this has caused through that clinical lens yeah there developed a new demographic of client that i hadn't seen before and it were there particularly service workers right that got laid off um and then got unemployment checks that were i had a lot of people come to me and say i made more money on unemployment um than i had ever made in my life and i was sitting alone sitting at home alone and then there's an app that i don't really care to advertise where they could order liquor delivered to their house every day and it created a perfect storm of really young service industry alcoholics and we have started to see them uh come to peaks where to your point maybe you know maybe they push some boundaries with how much they drink but being at home and being isolated and then having access to an entire liquor store through their phone that would be delivered and having more money than they've ever had with no really other way to spend it um it created this this demographic of people that were really isolated alone and not to mention i mean the overdoses are through the roof last year right i think that that data is in and clear um and suicides are up dramatically as well that isolation piece um is certainly a hidden uh component of this pandemic that you know we feel we're still we are still feeling the reverberations of that i think absolutely and i think it goes to that idea um you know that the opposite of addiction is connection correct yeah so this this in this lack of connection um triggered or pushed over the edge people that were maybe already teetering or feeling slightly disconnected or maybe i don't know if you're like me work is a huge connection you know like i that's all i do because you know you know that very well yeah you guys are my best friends yeah this is your social time right now yeah flower right here this is the best 15 minutes of my week</span></p> <p><span>but i think that losing it it shows i think as a society how important it is for us to stay connected to one another and when we don't feel connected we have this void that sort of forms and we're gonna fill that void of however we can and at the time there when you can't leave your house i mean you what else are you gonna do netflix will only take you so far so when i think it i mean it is an interesting point because yeah on the flip side of that you know we are you know my experience during the pandemic too is that like i saw my family and then i saw my work family and that is it i didn't see my extended family for months and months i didn't see my friends you know like we just we all got very isolated and to your point like fortunately we worked in an industry that needed to keep showing up and being on campus and like what a grace that was honestly because you know when i've had these clients come in and are like i was at home getting a 600 a week check</span></p> <p><span>um part of me is like yeah that had been me i don't know how to cope with that that's crazy and even being you know watching people you know having our whole clinical staff work from home right like starting off you know people are they they look okay in the beginning because i i mean you're you're doing video calls all day long you know i always made a real effort to always do face-to-face calls like make sure like hey turn your camera on i want to see you um i just think it's important for us to be able to connect and see one another um but there is a sort of steady grade of that a decline of mental health in general because i think even that virtual connection it's better than nothing but it's no replacement and i think that kind of speaks to the data that you mentioned at the very top of this that the that need for actual interaction and connection even within a physical place even if you're not touching there's just some sort of like energetic mumbo jumbo that's happening that actually helps us stay healthy and stay i don't know human yeah yeah when it never</span></p> <p><span>i have never read in any textbook in our field where an entire population is going through a shared trauma right clinicians clients like some of those walls of like it started to come down that we were all kind of in it absolutely and we were all kind of this wasn't like i'm counting i'm providing this counseling it's like well we're all kind of trying to survive right and i remember too like if clients wanted to leave during that time i'm like can i explain to you what the outside world is like you are you have more social connection in here you have more freedom in here you have a basketball hoop yeah you have all these things you can do in here you go home you don't have any of this good for retention brandon but yeah right yeah so uh well i think i think this is great because it ties into the initial data that i was talking it was well to hear that that fallout and that negativity as an experience it wasn't all negative but certainly and certainly individuals experienced telehealth in a positive aspect but what they lost was that connecting piece of it what inpatient programs lost at the same time was the ability to bring outside sources and connecting you know pieces into treatment in that regard and as well too as the pandemic continues to thrive in a variety of ways with the delta variant delta plus the lambda variance and all these sort of things what is happening that i want to be clear with the world about in front of us is that addiction treatment centers aren't armed with public health orders or any of this sort of piece at this time and so the general propensity for somebody who comes in and tests positive for covid is that they are going to be removed from the treatment setting and not able to access care and with that signing off thanks for joining us again here at finding peeks um find us on the socials the facebooks the instagrams the podcast please be sure to email us findingpeakspeaksrecovery.com for more insights and questions again to this covid piece that we're doing here today is because of the viewers you called on us to speak to it a little bit so we are always going to deliver you know answers moving forward on for the questions that you have so thanks again for joining us love you all stay safe until next time you</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq-child --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p><!-- wp:block {"ref":1510} /--></p>

Episode 10 - Two Pillars of Trauma Work 2021/07/05, 23:37
Episode 10 - Two Pillars of Trauma Work

<p> <!-- wp:cover {"url":"https:\/\/peaksrecovery.com\/wp-content\/uploads\/2021\/02\/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg","id":4918,"dimRatio":0,"focalPoint":{"x":"0.52","y":"0.50"},"align":"center","className":"nvd-bg-div"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-cover aligncenter nvd-bg-div"><img class="img-responsive" class= "wp-block-cover__image-background wp-image-4918" alt="" src= "https://peaksrecovery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/finding-peaks-talk-show-scaled.jpg" style="object-position:52% 50%" data-object-fit="cover" data-object-position="52% 50%" /> <div class="wp-block-cover__inner-container"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","level":1,"textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --> <h1 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-episode-10">Episode 10</h1> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","textColor":"white","className":"nvd-shadow-1"} --></p> <h2 class= "has-text-align-center nvd-shadow-1 has-white-color has-text-color" id="h-two-important-pillars-of-trauma-work">Two Important Pillars of Trauma Work</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cover --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"a3622e42","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/columns {"block_id":"bfdc58ad","classMigrate":true,"leftPadding":0,"rightPadding":0} --> <div class="uagb-columns__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-columns__inner-wrap uagb-columns__columns-2"> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"958e3d39","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-958e3d39"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-watch-now">Watch Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:embed {"url":"https:\/\/youtu.be\/wNzNpaGJ458","type":"video","providerNameSlug":"youtube","responsive":true,"className":"wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio"} --></p> <div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper"> https://youtu.be/wNzNpaGJ458</div> <p><!-- /wp:embed --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/column {"block_id":"5d9d9e36","classMigrate":true,"colWidth":50} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-column uagb-column__wrap uagb-column__background-undefined uagb-block-5d9d9e36"> <div class="uagb-column__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-column__inner-wrap"><!-- wp:heading --> <h2 id="h-listen-now">Listen Now</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:cgb/block-libsyn-podcasting-gutenberg --></p> <div class="wp-block-cgb-block-libsyn-podcasting-gutenberg"> <div class="libsyn-shortcode"></div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:cgb/block-libsyn-podcasting-gutenberg --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/column --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/columns --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"a06e3125","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-10-1">Episode 10</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">We dig deep into two very important aspects of trauma; establishing the awareness of where the trauma stems from, and then identifying how the trauma is affecting you in the present.</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:paragraph {"align":"center"} --></p> <p class="has-text-align-center">Topics:</p> <p><!-- /wp:paragraph --></p> <p><!-- wp:list --></p> <ul> <li>We each dive into what trauma is and what it looks like from an individual standpoint.</li> <li>Jason and Clinton get to the "why" and "what" of trauma</li> <li><span style="font-size: 1rem">Exploring the deep relationship between trauma and shame</span></li> </ul> <p><!-- /wp:list --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"3a50d4e6","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"color","backgroundColor":"#225b67"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center","style":{"color":{"text":"#fff351"}}} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center has-text-color" id= "h-select-quotes" style="color:#fff351">Select Quotes</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/blockquote {"block_id":"0941cd6f","classMigrate":true,"descriptionText":"In my opinion, it's hard to change things that we aren\u2019t truly conscious or aware of. Trauma can still have an effect without ever coming becoming conscious, so I think it can also be difficult in the here and now to work on things that haven\u2019t at least been brought forward to some degree in the consciousness.\u00a0","descColor":"#ffffff","author":"Jason Friesema, MA, LPC, LAC - Chief Clinical Officer","authorColor":"#ffffff","enableTweet":false} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-blockquote uagb-blockquote__outer-wrap uagb-block-0941cd6f"> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__wrap uagb-blockquote__skin-border uagb-blockquote__stack-img-none"> <blockquote class="uagb-blockquote"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content-wrap"> <div class="uagb-blockquote__content">In my opinion, it's hard to change things that we aren’t truly conscious or aware of. Trauma can still have an effect without ever coming becoming conscious, so I think it can also be difficult in the here and now to work on things that haven’t at least been brought forward to some degree in the consciousness. </div> <div class= "uagb-blockquote__author-wrap uagb-blockquote__author-at-left"> <cite class="uagb-blockquote__author">Jason Friesema, MA, LPC, LAC - Chief Clinical Officer</cite></div> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/blockquote --></p> <p><!-- wp:spacer {"height":50} --></p> <div style="height:50px" aria-hidden="true" class= "wp-block-spacer"></div> <p><!-- /wp:spacer --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/section {"classMigrate":true,"block_id":"291fca6d","topPadding":80,"bottomPadding":80,"contentWidth":"full_width","backgroundType":"none","backgroundColor":"#f6f7f9"} --></p> <div class="uagb-section__overlay"></div> <div class="uagb-section__inner-wrap"> <!-- wp:heading {"textAlign":"center"} --> <h2 class="has-text-align-center" id="h-episode-transcripts"> Episode Transcripts</h2> <p><!-- /wp:heading --></p> <p> <!-- wp:uagb/faq {"block_id":"83717311","schema":"{\u0022@context\u0022:\u0022https:\/\/schema.org\u0022,\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022FAQPage\u0022,\u0022@id\u0022:\u0022https:\/\/peaksrecovery.com\/?p=7170\u0022,\u0022mainEntity\u0022:[{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Question\u0022,\u0022name\u0022:\u0022Episode 10 Transcript\u0022,\u0022acceptedAnswer\u0022:{\u0022@type\u0022:\u0022Answer\u0022,\u0022text\u0022:\u0022\u0022}}]}"} --></p> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq uagb-faq__outer-wrap uagb-block-83717311 uagb-faq-icon-row uagb-faq-layout-accordion uagb-faq-expand-first-false uagb-faq-inactive-other-true uagb-faq-equal-height" data-faqtoggle="true" role="tablist"> <div class="uagb-faq__wrap uagb-buttons-layout-wrap"> <!-- wp:uagb/faq-child {"block_id":"d7e3d626","question":"Episode 10 Transcript","answer":""} --> <div class= "wp-block-uagb-faq-child uagb-faq-child__outer-wrap uagb-block-d7e3d626"> <div class="uagb-faq-child__wrapper"> <div class="uagb-faq-item" role="tab"> <div class="uagb-faq-questions-button uagb-faq-questions"> <span class="uagb-question">Episode 10 Transcript</span></div> <div class="uagb-faq-content"><span><br /> <br /></span></div> </div> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq-child --></p> </div> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/faq --></p> </div> <p><!-- /wp:uagb/section --></p> <p><!-- wp:block {"ref":1510} /--></p>